A great man is one who collects knowledge the way a bee collects honey and uses it to help people overcome the difficulties they endure - hunger, ignorance and disease!
- Nikola Tesla

Remember, remember always, that all of us, and you and I especially, are descended from immigrants and revolutionists.
- Franklin Roosevelt

While their territory has been devastated and their homes despoiled, the spirit of the Serbian people has not been broken.
- Woodrow Wilson

Did you know? ​A Saint who Voted

Saint Sebastian (Dabovich) of Jackson (b.1863-d.1940), the first Eastern Orthodox priest to be born in the United States, is one of the rare canonized saints known to have voted in U.S. elections. Historical voter registration records from the State of California show that Saint Sebastian registered to vote in the 1890 and 1898 Congressional and Gubernatorial elections in his native San Francisco. Interestingly, the 1898 election on Tuesday, November 8th, coincided with the Feast of St. Archangel Michael.

In this polarized electoral season, it is perhaps fitting to end with the words that St. Sebastian himself wrote in the Preface of his book on the Lives of the Saints, "we have no comments to make; let the facts in the histories of the lives of holy men and women speak for themselves; we only repeat that, the Spirit breatheth where He will."

People Directory

Mihajlo Pupin

Mihajlo Idvorski Pupin, Ph.D, LL.D. (October 4th, 1858 - March 12th, 1935) was a Serbian physicist, best known for devising means of greatly extending the range of long-distance telephone communication by placing loading coils (of wire) at predetermined intervals along the transmitting wire (known as pupinization).

Pupin was born in the village Idvor, Banat (then the Austro-Hungarian Empire) to a Serbian family. Pupin emigrated to U.S. when he was only 16.

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Publishing

Serbian Americans: History—Culture—Press

by Krinka Vidaković-Petrov, translated from Serbian by Milina Jovanović

Learned, lucid, and deeply perceptive, SERBIAN AMERICANS is an immensely rewarding and readable book, which will give historians invaluable new insights, and general readers exciting new ways to approach the history​ of Serbian printed media. Serbian immigration to the U.S. started dates from the first few decades of 19th c. The first papers were published in San Francisco starting in 1893. During the years of the most intense politicization of the Serbian American community, the Serbian printed media developed quickly with a growing number of daily, weekly, monthly and yearly publications. Newspapers were published in Serbian print shops, while the development of printing presses was a precondition for the growth of publishing in general. Among them were various kinds of books: classical Serbian literature, folksong collections, political pamphlets, works of the earliest Serbian American writers in America (poetry, prose and plays), first translations from English to Serbian, books about Serb immigrants, dictionaries, textbooks, primers, etc.

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