A great man is one who collects knowledge the way a bee collects honey and uses it to help people overcome the difficulties they endure - hunger, ignorance and disease!
- Nikola Tesla

Remember, remember always, that all of us, and you and I especially, are descended from immigrants and revolutionists.
- Franklin Roosevelt

While their territory has been devastated and their homes despoiled, the spirit of the Serbian people has not been broken.
- Woodrow Wilson

Jovan Dučić

Jovan Dučić (February 1871 – 7 April 1943) was a Herzegovinian Serb poet, writer and diplomat. He was born in Trebinje at the time part of Bosnia Vilayet within Ottoman Empire on 17 February (or 5 February according to the Julian calendar) 1871.

Jovan Dučić died on 7 April 1943 and was buried in the Serbian Orthodox monastery of Saint Sava in Libertyville, Illinois. He expressed a wish in his will to be buried in his home town of Trebinje, a goal which was finally realized when he was reburied there on 22 October 2000 in the newly built Gračanica church.


People Directory

Ilija Ika Panajotovic

Ilija "Ika" Panajotovic (25 April 1932 - 18 July 2001) was a Serbian film producer and tennis player.

Panajotovic, who made the junior semi-finals at Wimbledon in 1948, won back to back Yugoslavian Junior Championship titles in 1948 and 1949.

The Serbian competed in 12 Grand Slam tournaments during his career, all in the 1950s. He appeared at Wimbledon seven times and played in the French Championships on five occasions. From 1953 to 1959, Panajotovic participated in Wimbledon every year and made the third round in the 1958 Championships. He had a five set win over Akhtar Ali in the second round, before exiting to tournament with a loss to sixth seed Kurt Nielsen. In the men's doubles he also had success, with Panajotovic and his partner Ivko Plecevic reaching the quarter-finals.

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Publishing

Jesus Christ Is The Same Yesterday Today And Unto the Ages

In this latest and, in every respect, meaningful study, Bishop Athanasius, in the manner of the Holy Fathers, and firmly relying upon the Apostles John and Paul, argues that the Old Testament name of God, “YHWH,” a revealed to Moses at Sinai, was translated by both Apostles (both being Hebrews) into the language of the New Testament in a completely original and articulate manner.  In this sense, they do not follow the Septuagint, in which the name, “YHWH,” appears together with the phrase “the one who is”, a word which is, in a certain sense, a philosophical-ontological translation (that term would undoubtedly become significant for the conversion of the Greeks in the Gospels).  The two Apostles, rather, translate this in a providential, historical-eschatological, i.e. in a specifically Christological sense.  Thus, John carries the word “YHWH” over with “the One Who Is, Who was and Who is to Come” (Rev. 1:8 & 22…), while for Paul “Jesus Christ is the Same Yesterday, Today and Unto the Ages” (Heb. 13:8).