A great man is one who collects knowledge the way a bee collects honey and uses it to help people overcome the difficulties they endure - hunger, ignorance and disease!
- Nikola Tesla

Remember, remember always, that all of us, and you and I especially, are descended from immigrants and revolutionists.
- Franklin Roosevelt

While their territory has been devastated and their homes despoiled, the spirit of the Serbian people has not been broken.
- Woodrow Wilson

Imprints in the Landscape: Serbian Toponyms in North America

Marinel Mandreš
Wilfrid Laurier University

Complementing an earlier article that identified Serbian place-names throughout the world, this composition concentrates upon commemorative appellations in the United States and Canada.1 It examines the historical circumstances by which existing, mistaken, altered, and apparent place-names arose; it also attempts to establish a naming pattern. North American geographical nomenclature includes numerous foreign designations that were not randomly chosen. Representing the intersection of geography and history, place-names preserve various aspects of a country’s national and cultural heritage that might otherwise be overlooked or forgotten by successive generations. Bestowed by early immigrants or offered by postal authorities and entrepreneurs, toponyms of a definite Serbian origin reflect prevailing attitudes towards Serbia and Montenegro at the time of their designation.

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Existing Toponyms

An investigation of contemporary nomenclature inevitably involves historical anecdotes and a recounting of the personalities and events that produced them. Reasons for the naming of most places were determined. Some historical sources provide incomplete, speculative, and possibly incorrect information regarding place-name origins due to omissions, digressive explanations, and/or an absence of detailed documentation. Locally invented and recounted ex post facto explanations of probable origins should not be considered as definitive accounts. Extensive correspondence was maintained with several historical societies in an effort to ensure factual accuracy when exceedingly limited published data was available. Records related to the founding of some communities are elusive or no longer exist. In the absence of other reliable information,post office opening and closing dates provided clues as to when asettlement was established, active, and declined. It was impossible to investigate “paper towns” created by land speculators during the 1800s.

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Source: Serbian Studies

People Directory

Vladan Bataveljic

Vladan Bataveljic was born in Kutlovo, district of Kragujevac. Graduates from Faculty of Law of the University of Belgrade in 1929. Specialization in law studies finishes in Grenoble, France. Establishes a law office in Belgrade, Poenkareova 32. Owner and editor of the magazine for literature and art "Razmena" with office in Beogradska street 35, Belgrade. Writes poetry, does caricature drawing and writes art and literary criticism.

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On Divine Philanthropy

From Plato to John Chrysostom

by Bishop Danilo Krstic

This book describes the use of the notion of divine philanthropy from its first appearance in Aeschylos and Plato to the highly polyvalent use of it by John Chrysostom. Each page is marked by meticulous scholarship and great insight, lucidity of thought and expression. Bishop Danilo’s principal methodology in examining Chrysostom is a philological analysis of his works in order to grasp all the semantic shades of the concept of philanthropia throughout his vast literary output. The author overviews the observable development of the concept of philanthropia in a research that encompasses nearly seven centuries of literary sources. Peculiar theological connotations are studied in the uses of divine philanthropia both in the classical development from Aeschylos via Plutarch down to Libanius, Themistius of Byzantium and the Emperor Julian, as well as in the biblical development, especially from Philo and the New Testament through Origen and the Cappadocians to Chrysostom.

With this book, the author invites us to re-read Chrysostom’s golden pages on the ineffable philanthropy of God. "There is a modern ring in Chrysostom’s attempt to prove that we are loved—no matter who and where we are—and even infinitely loved, since our Friend and Lover is the infinite Triune God."

The victory of Chrysostom’s use of philanthropia meant the affirmation of ecclesial culture even at the level of Graeco-Roman culture. May we witness the same reality today in the modern techno-scientific world in which we live.