A great man is one who collects knowledge the way a bee collects honey and uses it to help people overcome the difficulties they endure - hunger, ignorance and disease!
- Nikola Tesla

Remember, remember always, that all of us, and you and I especially, are descended from immigrants and revolutionists.
- Franklin Roosevelt

While their territory has been devastated and their homes despoiled, the spirit of the Serbian people has not been broken.
- Woodrow Wilson

Branko Tomović

Branko Tomović (Serbian Cyrillic: Бранко Томовић; born June 17, 1980) is a Serbian-German actor. He was born in Münster, Germany, though his actual origin is from the Carpathians in Serbia. His parents emigrated in the 70's from the Golubac Fortress area on the Danube and Branko was raised between Germany and Serbia before he studied acting at the prestigious Lee Strasberg Theatre Institute in New York City. Tomović was first seen on the big screen in the lead role in the American Film Institute/Sundance drama Remote Control, for which he received the OmU-Award at the Potsdam Film Festival.

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Currently settled in London, with his dark, brooding looks he has appeared in striking roles on British Television. He played the creepy main suspect Antoni Pricha, the Morgue Man, in Jack the Ripper thriller Whitechapel, the pyromaniac Junky-Henchman Marek Lisowski in the final episodes of A Touch of Frost and Polish fighter pilot Miroslaw Feric in the World War II drama The Untold Battle of Britain. Tomovic has worked with internationally respected film directors as Ken Loach, Sönke Wortmann and Paul Greengrass. He was named "One to Watch" by Moviescope Magazine in 2008 and recent film credits include The Bourne Ultimatum opposite Matt Damon (Dir. Paul Greengrass), It's a Free World... (Dir. Ken Loach), The Wolf Man (Dir. Joe Johnston), Pope Joan (Dir. Sönke Wortmann) and Interview with a Hitman (Dir. Perry Bhandal). In 2010, he won the 'Best Actor' Award at the San Francisco Short Film Festival and at The Accolade Film Awards for his performance as a Serbian soldier who is tormented by grief and guilt after being a witness of war crimes in the drama Inbetween.

Awards:

  • Philadelphia Documentary & Fiction Film Festival 2011 - Best Actor for "The Crossmaker"
  • Goldie Film Awards 2011 - Special Award for Best Actor for "The Crossmaker"
  • San Francisco Short Film Festival Award 2010 - Best Actor for "Inbetween"
  • The Accolade Film Awards 2010 - Best Leading Actor for "Inbetween"
  • MovieScope Magazine 2008 - "One to Watch"
  • Potsdam Film Festival 2002 - OmU-Award for "Remote Control"

Filmography (Selection):

  • Law and Order UK (2013)
  • Silent Witness (2013)
  • Ein Fall für zwei - Adams Sünde (2013)
  • Entity (2012)
  • Believe the Magic (2012)
  • Interview with a Hitman (2012)
  • Strike Back (2011) (TV)
  • Coming Up - Home (2011) (TV)
  • Will (2011)
  • Tatort (2011) (TV)
  • Polizeiruf 110 (2010) (TV)
  • The Untold Battle of Britain (2010) (TV)
  • A Touch of Frost (2010) (TV)
  • Pope Joan (2009)
  • The Wolf Man (2010)
  • Whitechapel (2009) (TV)
  • Inbetween (2008)
  • Into the Woods (2008)
  • Taximan (2008)
  • Casualty (2008) (TV)
  • The Bourne Ultimatum (2007)
  • It's a Free World... (2007)
  • The Bill (2007) (TV)
  • Amor Fati (2005)
  • Dirty Seed (2005)
  • Casualty (2005) (TV)
  • Siska (2003) (TV)
  • Bella Block (2002) (TV)
  • Remote Control (2001)

Links: 

From Wikipedia


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People Directory

Danilo Mandić

Danilo Mandić is a doctoral student in the Department of Sociology. Mandić was born and raised in Belgrade, Serbia and received his BA from Princeton.

Research Interests: Comparative historical sociology; nationalism; post-Communist transitions; Balkan history; US foreign policy and social theory.

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Publishing

My Brother's Keeper

by Fr. Radovan Bigovic

Rare are the books of Orthodox Christian authors that deal with the subject of politics in a comprehensive way. It is taken for granted that politics has to do with the secularized (legal) protection of human rights (a reproduction of the philosophy of the Enlightenment), within the political system of so-called "representative democracy", which is limited mostly to social utility or to the conventional rules of human relations. Most Christians look at politics and democracy as unrelated with their experience of the Church herself, which abides both in history and in the Kingdom, the eschaton. Today, the commercialization of politics—its submission to the laws of publicity and the brainwashing of the masses—has literally abolished the "representative" parliamentary system. So, why bother with politics when every citizen of so-called developed societies has a direct everyday experience of the rapid decline and alienation of the fundamental aspects of modernity?

In the Orthodox milieu, Christos Yannaras has highlighted the conception of the social and political event that is borne by the Orthodox ecclesiastical tradition, which entails a personalistic (assumes an infinite value of the human person as opposed to Western utilitarian individualism) and relational approach. Fr Radovan Bigovic follows this approach. In this book, the reader will find a faithful engagement with the liturgical and patristic traditions, with contemporary thinkers, Orthodox and non-Orthodox, all in conversation with political science and philosophy. As an excellent Orthodox theologian and a proponent of dialogue, rooted in the catholic (holistic) being of the Orthodox Church and of his Serbian people, Fr Radovan offers a methodology that encompasses the above-mentioned concerns and quests.