A great man is one who collects knowledge the way a bee collects honey and uses it to help people overcome the difficulties they endure - hunger, ignorance and disease!
- Nikola Tesla

Remember, remember always, that all of us, and you and I especially, are descended from immigrants and revolutionists.
- Franklin Roosevelt

While their territory has been devastated and their homes despoiled, the spirit of the Serbian people has not been broken.
- Woodrow Wilson

Allex Mandusich

Andjelko "Big Jake Alex" Mandusich is a recipient of the Congressional Medal of Honor, and was one of the greatest Serbian-American heroes of World War I.

He was born on July 13th, 1887 at Sar Planina, Serbia. In 1905, at the age of 18, he immigrated to America.

When the US entered World War I, Mandusich immediately enrolled himself in the Army. During the battle in Amiens region in France in August of 1918, Jake, now a corporal, advanced his men at Chipilly Ridge; there were many casualties and in the heat of the battle Alex realized that all officers had been hit and that he was now the leader of his platoon. His men were pinned down by machine gunfire from a German nest thirty yards away. Under intense fire Manudsich made his way to the nest alone; he pulled out his bayonet and attacked.. He killed five Germans outright but then his bayonet snapped. He used the barrel of his bayonet as a club and subdued fifteen more enemy soldiers. When the rest of the platoon arrived Alex was immediately recognized as a hero and nicknamed "Big Jake". For his amazing bravery Big Jake was awarded the highest distinction given to a United States soldier, the Congressional Medal of Honor.

He also received numerous medals from different countries: U.S. Distinguished Service Cross/Victory Medal with Four Bars, France's Medaille Militaire and Croise de Guerre with Palms, Yugoslav's Gold Karageorge Star with Cross Sabers, Great Britain Distinguished Conduct Medal, Italy' Merito Guerre, and others.

Following the end of the War and his discharge from the U.S. Army, Big Jake returned to Yugoslavia and spent several years in King Alexander's Royal Guard.



SA

 

People Directory

Bishop Hrizostom (Stolić)

(1988–2012)

After the death of Bishop Grigorije the Western Diocese was administered by Irinej, Bishop of Niš, from October 1985 until May 1986, and by Sava, Bishop of Šumadija, from July 1986 until May 1988.

The Holy Bishops’ Assembly at the regular session in May 1988 elected Archimandrite Hrizostom Stolić as a Bishop of the Western Diocese.

Bishop Hrizostom was born in 1939 in Ruma where he graduated from elementary school and middle school (High School). After High School he went to the Dečani Monastery where he took monastic vows. He was ordained to hierodeacon and hieromonk by Rt. Rev. Pavle, Bishop of Ras-Prizren. Soon afterwards he went to America to be at the service to his Church and people. He studied at the Seminary in the Russian Holy Trinity Monastery in Jordanville. He then came to Chicago and helped the pastor at Holy Resurrection Church with his duties. He was appointed temporary pastor of St. George Church in East Chicago, Indiana in 1967. He remained there until 1969. For two years he established firm spiritual roots in the community. He felt a higher calling and responded to it. In 1969 he went to the Hilandar Monastery at Mount Athos in Greece, where he remained for nineteen years. There he was elevated to the rank of archimandrite by the Patriarch of Constantinople, His Holiness Demitrius the First. At one time he was elected a Dean of Mount Athos. He was a librarian in the Hilandar Monastery. Along with the spiritual growth he advanced his intellectual dimensions. He published the Lives of the Holy Fathers in two volumes and the Liturgy of St. Apostle James, which he translated into the Serbian language.

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Publishing

On Divine Philanthropy

From Plato to John Chrysostom

by Bishop Danilo Krstic

This book describes the use of the notion of divine philanthropy from its first appearance in Aeschylos and Plato to the highly polyvalent use of it by John Chrysostom. Each page is marked by meticulous scholarship and great insight, lucidity of thought and expression. Bishop Danilo’s principal methodology in examining Chrysostom is a philological analysis of his works in order to grasp all the semantic shades of the concept of philanthropia throughout his vast literary output. The author overviews the observable development of the concept of philanthropia in a research that encompasses nearly seven centuries of literary sources. Peculiar theological connotations are studied in the uses of divine philanthropia both in the classical development from Aeschylos via Plutarch down to Libanius, Themistius of Byzantium and the Emperor Julian, as well as in the biblical development, especially from Philo and the New Testament through Origen and the Cappadocians to Chrysostom.

With this book, the author invites us to re-read Chrysostom’s golden pages on the ineffable philanthropy of God. "There is a modern ring in Chrysostom’s attempt to prove that we are loved—no matter who and where we are—and even infinitely loved, since our Friend and Lover is the infinite Triune God."

The victory of Chrysostom’s use of philanthropia meant the affirmation of ecclesial culture even at the level of Graeco-Roman culture. May we witness the same reality today in the modern techno-scientific world in which we live.