A great man is one who collects knowledge the way a bee collects honey and uses it to help people overcome the difficulties they endure - hunger, ignorance and disease!
- Nikola Tesla

Remember, remember always, that all of us, and you and I especially, are descended from immigrants and revolutionists.
- Franklin Roosevelt

While their territory has been devastated and their homes despoiled, the spirit of the Serbian people has not been broken.
- Woodrow Wilson

Hilandar Research Library and Resource Center for Medieval Slavic Studies

The Hilandar Research Library has the largest collection of medieval Slavic manuscripts on microform in the world.

The Hilandar Research Library’s (HRL) millions of folia of manuscript material on microform from more than 100 different private, museum, and library collections in dozens of countries are utilized by scholars from all over the world. The collection includes several thousand Cyrillic manuscripts on microform, with over 1200 from several monasteries on Mount Athos, Greece, including the entire Slavic manuscript collection of Hilandar Monastery. The Hilandar Research Library also contains a large specialized reference collection, in print and in microform, as well as a growing collection of original manuscripts and artifacts from the medieval Slavic world. Located at The Ohio State University, the HRL shares its space with the Resource Center for Medieval Slavic Studies.

The Resource Center for Medieval Slavic Studies fosters and supports research and collaboration in medieval Slavic languages, linguistics, history, and culture.

Founded in 1984, the Resource Center for Medieval Slavic Studies (RCMSS) is an independent center of The Ohio State University College of Humanities and is dedicated to the promotion of medieval Slavic Studies. The RCMSS maintains particularly close ties, as well as sharing space with, the Hilandar Research Library. Both entities developed as an outgrowth of the original Hilandar Research Project, which ran from 1969 to 1982. The RCMSS is the only such non-national based or oriented center in the United States, although it does tend to promote Cyrillic-based research. The Center strives to accomplish its goals through the support of the preservation and access activities of the HRL, the promotion of research, the provisions of stipends and travel research funds, the funding of materials acquisition and preservation, publication support, and through the sponsorship of lectures, workshops, and conferences.

To date, the RCMSS has sponsored or co-sponsored a series of international “Hilandar” conferences, as well as national conferences, panels, and individual presentations. RCMSS has fostered international scholarship and collaboration by bringing scholars together to work on previously-inaccessible medieval Slavic resources.

Click here to go to the web-site of the Hilandar Research Library and Resource Center for Medieval Slavic Studies

Click here to go to the Collections & Access page

Additional Link: The Steven Enich Serbian Orthodox Culture Slide Collection at The Ohio State University Knowledge Bank

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People Directory

Oksana Germain

Oksana Germain, age 17, has been studying classical piano for 12 years. Her love of classical music was obvious from a very young age. Eagerly requesting piano lessons at age five, Oksana began learning locally with Mrs. Vera Rathje and Mrs. Yulia Atoyan. At age 13, Oksana was accepted as a student of world-renowned pedagogue and pianist, the late Dr. Vitaly Margulis, professor at UCLA. She continued her piano studies under Professor Margulis' tutelage until his passing in 2011. Since that time, Oksana has been studying with the dedicated and gifted, international pianist, Dr. Sarkis Baltaian of Los Angeles.

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Publishing

Serbian Americans: History—Culture—Press

by Krinka Vidaković-Petrov, translated from Serbian by Milina Jovanović

Learned, lucid, and deeply perceptive, SERBIAN AMERICANS is an immensely rewarding and readable book, which will give historians invaluable new insights, and general readers exciting new ways to approach the history​ of Serbian printed media. Serbian immigration to the U.S. started dates from the first few decades of 19th c. The first papers were published in San Francisco starting in 1893. During the years of the most intense politicization of the Serbian American community, the Serbian printed media developed quickly with a growing number of daily, weekly, monthly and yearly publications. Newspapers were published in Serbian print shops, while the development of printing presses was a precondition for the growth of publishing in general. Among them were various kinds of books: classical Serbian literature, folksong collections, political pamphlets, works of the earliest Serbian American writers in America (poetry, prose and plays), first translations from English to Serbian, books about Serb immigrants, dictionaries, textbooks, primers, etc.

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