A great man is one who collects knowledge the way a bee collects honey and uses it to help people overcome the difficulties they endure - hunger, ignorance and disease!
- Nikola Tesla

Remember, remember always, that all of us, and you and I especially, are descended from immigrants and revolutionists.
- Franklin Roosevelt

While their territory has been devastated and their homes despoiled, the spirit of the Serbian people has not been broken.
- Woodrow Wilson

Mirjana Joković

Mirjana Joković (Serbian Cyrillic: Мирјана Јоковић) (born November 24, 1967) is a Serbian film and stage actress, best known for her role as Natalija Zovkov in Underground, the film of Emir Kusturica (1995). She currently is Director of Performance for Acting and an acting teacher in the Theater Faculty of the California Institute of the Arts near Los Angeles.

Mirjana Jokovic was born in Belgrade, Yugoslavia. She spent her early years in Zambia, where her father was an industrial engineer.

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She was graduated from the Academy of Dramatic Arts in Belgrade and began to perform at the National Theater and the Yugoslav Drama Theater in Belgrade and in films and television. She was a regular character in the popular Yugoslav television series "Grey Home", and in 1988 she was named Best Leading Actress at the Rio de Janeiro Film Festival and Best International Actress at the San Sebastian Film Festival in Spain.

In 1989, she played the lead in the German film "Serbian Girl" directed by Peter Sehr, then she starred with Daniel Day Lewis in "Eversmile, New Jersey" directed by Carlos Sorin and won best actress for San Sebastián International Film Festival. In 1993 she moved to the United States, but she continued to make films in Serbia. She starred in "Vukovar" (1994) which earned her the Yugoslav Best Actress Award. In 1995 she played the female lead in the film "Underground", directed by Emir Kusturica, which won the Palme d'Or for best film at the Cannes Film Festival in 1995 and the New York Critics Circle Award for best foreign film. She also made "Three Summer Days" (1997), for which she received another Yugoslav Best Actress Award, and Cabaret Balkan, which won a Special Venice Film Festival Award in 1999.

She moved to the United States in 1993 and began a new career in American theater, appearing in the off-Broadway production of "Mud, River Stone" by Lynn Nottage at the Playwrights Horizon Theater. She also appeared in the chorus and as Chrsitothemys in the Broadway production of "Electra" directed by David Leveaux.

From 1997 through 2001 she worked at the American Repertory Theater in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Her roles at ART included Dulle Griet in "Full Circle" by Chuck Mee, Hermione in Shakespeare's "Winter's Tale", Desdemona in "Othello", the part of Natasha/Olga Knipper in "Three Farces and a Funeral" by Robert Brustein, and "Mother Courage and Her Children" by Bertolt Brecht.

In 2003 she played in "Romeo and Juliet", directed by Emily Mann, at the McCarter Theater and made the film "A Better Way to Die" directed by Scott Wiper for HBO. She also starred Off-Broadway in "Necessary Targets" by Eve Ensler, "Electra" by Sophocles at the Hartford Stage, and "Three Sisters" by Anton Chekhov at the American Conservatory Theater in San Francisco.

After her starring role in "Underground", she appeared in several European and American films. She played the part of Elena Iscovescu in "Side Streets", (CargoFilms/nuMedien) in 1998; the part of Adrijana, in "Strsljen" (also known as The Hornet, Le frelon, and Grenxa) (Cinema Design Belgrade) in 1998; the part of Ana in "Bure baruta" (also known as Cabaret Balkan, The Powder Keg, and Baril de poudre) (Paramount Pictures) in 1998; the part of a hotel maid in "Maid in Manhattan" (Columbia Pictures) in 2002; and as Tess in "Private Property" (Chiaroscuro Pictures) in 2002.

In 200- she began to teach in the Theater Faculty at the California Institute of the Arts in Valencia, California.

In April 2010 she helped organize the first theater workshop via Internet between CalArts and the Moscow Art Theater School in Moscow, under the auspices of the Binational Presidential Commission created by President Barack Obama and Russian President Dmitri Medvedev. In June 2010 she was invited to come to Moscow by the U.S. Embassy as the first Binational Presidential Commission cultural envoy to stimulate new exchanges with Moscow theaters and theater schools.

Wikipedia


People Directory

Richard Milanovich

Birth: Dec. 4, 1942, Banning, Riverside County, California, USA
Death: Mar. 12, 2012, Rancho Mirage, Riverside County, California, USA

Born to an Indian mother and Serbian father, Richard M. Milanovich grew up in poverty in Palm Springs, living in a shack and receiving government handouts of surplus food. He served as in infantryman in the United States Army from 1960-1963, and later returned to the Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians Reservation to engage in tribal politics. Eventually he was elected Chairman of the Band in 1984, and became a major figure in the development of casino operations on Indian land in the region and California. Through his vision and leadership, the Agua Caliente Band became the most prosperous group of Indians in the United States, and were able to make major contributions to the economy of the Palm Springs area. As Chairman, he was invited to the White House to consult with the President and other political officials. California Governor Jerry Brown, Congresswoman Mary Bono-Mack, Palm Springs Mayor Steve Pougnet, and Tribal Chairpersons from throughout California all eulogized Chairman Milanovich at the memorial service held in his honor held at the Palm Springs Convention Center. He was buried in a service attended by family and close friends.

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Publishing

Sailors of the Sky

A conversation with Fr. Stamatis Skliris and Fr. Marko Rupnik on contemporary Christian art

In these timely conversations led by Fr. Radovan Bigovic, many issues are introduced that enable the contemporary reader to deepen and expand his or her understanding of the role of art in the life of the Church. Here we find answers to questions on the crisis of contemporary ecclesiastical art in West and East; the impact of Impressionism, Expressionism, Cubism, Surrealism and Abstract painting on contemporary ecclesiastical painting; and a consideration of the main distrinction between iconography and secular painting. The dialogue, while resolving some doubts about the difference between iconography, religious painting, and painting in general, reconciles the requirement to obey inconographic canons with the freedom essential to artistic creativity, demonstrating that obedience to the canons is not a threat to the vitatlity of iconography. Both artists illumine the role of prayer and ascetisicm in the art of iconography. They also mention curcial differences between iconography in the Orthodox Church and in Roman Catholicism. How important thse distinctions are when exploring the relationship between contemporary theology and art! In a time when postmodern "metaphysics' revitalizes every concept, these masters still believe that, to some extent, Post-Modernism adds to the revitatiztion of Christian art, stimulating questions about "artistic inspiration" and the essential asethetic categories of Christian painting. Their exceptionally wide, yet nonetheless deep, expertise assists their not-so-everday connections between theology, ar, and modern issues concerning society: "society" taken in its broader meaning as "civilization." Finally, the entire artistic project of Stamatis and Rupnik has important ecumenical implications that aswer a genuine longing for unity in the Christian word.

The text of this 94-page soft-bound book has been translated from the Serbian by Ivana Jakovljevic, Fr. Gregory Edwards, and Andrijana Krstic. Published by Sebastian Press, Western American Diocese of the Serbian Orthodox Church, Contemporary Christian Thought Series, number 7, First Edition, ISBN: 978-0-9719505-8-0