A great man is one who collects knowledge the way a bee collects honey and uses it to help people overcome the difficulties they endure - hunger, ignorance and disease!
- Nikola Tesla

Remember, remember always, that all of us, and you and I especially, are descended from immigrants and revolutionists.
- Franklin Roosevelt

While their territory has been devastated and their homes despoiled, the spirit of the Serbian people has not been broken.
- Woodrow Wilson

Allex Mandusich

Andjelko "Big Jake Alex" Mandusich is a recipient of the Congressional Medal of Honor, and was one of the greatest Serbian-American heroes of World War I.

He was born on July 13th, 1887 at Sar Planina, Serbia. In 1905, at the age of 18, he immigrated to America.

When the US entered World War I, Mandusich immediately enrolled himself in the Army. During the battle in Amiens region in France in August of 1918, Jake, now a corporal, advanced his men at Chipilly Ridge; there were many casualties and in the heat of the battle Alex realized that all officers had been hit and that he was now the leader of his platoon. His men were pinned down by machine gunfire from a German nest thirty yards away. Under intense fire Manudsich made his way to the nest alone; he pulled out his bayonet and attacked..

Read more ...

Louis Cukela

Louis Cukela (May 1st, 1888 - March 19th, 1956) was a famous United States Marine. He was awarded both the Navy and Army Medals of Honor, as well as numerous decorations from France, Italy, and his native Kingdom of Yugoslavia.

He was born and raised in Split (while it was still under Austro-Hungarian rule), and subsequently attended the Merchant Academy and later, the Royal Gymnasium, both for two years. In 1913, Cukela emigrated to the United States and, with his brother, settled in Minneapolis, Minnesota.

On September 21st, 1914, he enlisted in the U.S. Army. Three years later, on January 31st 1917, with war raging in Europe, he enlisted in the U. S. Marine Corps. Following the United States' entry into the conflict, he went to France and fought alongside his servicemen in the 5th Marines.

.
Read more ...

Peter Tomich

Peter Tomich (June 3rd, 1893 - December 7th, 1941) was born in Prolog, at that time in the Austro-Hungarian Empire. For his courage during the raid on Pearl Harbor he was awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor.

During World War I he served in the US Army. After enlisting in the United States Navy in January 1919, he initially served on the destroyer Litchfield.

.
Read more ...

Mitchell Paige

Mitchell Paige was awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor for his heroic efforts on Oct. 26th, 1942 at Guadalcanal in the Solomon Islands.

Col. Paige was born in a small western Pennsylvania town of Charleroi, near the Ohio state line. His parents were Serb immigrants who came to the U.S. around the turn of the 20th century from the Serbian Vojna Krajina, which was back then a part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire. .

Read more ...

Milo Radulovich

Milo John Radulovich (October 28, 1926 – November 19, 2007) was an American citizen (born in Detroit) of Serbian descent and former reserve Air Force lieutenant who was accused of being a security risk for maintaining a "close and continuing relationship" with his father and sister, in violation of Air Force regulation 35-62. His case was publicized nationally by Edward Murrow on October 20, 1953, on Murrow's program, See It Now:

“That [Air Force regulation 35-62] is a regulation which states that 'A man may be regarded as a security risk if he has close and continuing associations with communists or people believed to have communist sympathies.' Lieutenant Radulovich was asked to resign in August. He declined. A board was called and heard his case. At the end, it was recommended that he be severed from the Air Force. Although it was also stated that there was no question whatever as to the Lieutenant's loyalty.—Edward R. Murrow”

.
Read more ...

Mele "Mel" Vojvodich

Mele Vojvodich Jr. was born of Serbian ancestry on March 28, 1929 in Steubenville, Ohio. He went on to become Major-General in the USAF. For his bravery he was awarded the Legion of Merit.

Looking back at the career, Vojvodich received his pilot wings in 1950 from Nellis Air Force Base in Nevada. Six years later, he graduated from Squadron Officer School at Maxwell Air Force Base in Alabama. During 1971, he completed his studies at National War College Fort Lesley J. McNair in Washington DC.

.
Read more ...

Lance Sijan

Lance Peter Sijan (April 13th, 1942 - January 22nd, 1968) was a United States Air Force officer and fighter pilot. He was awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor for his selflessness and courage.

Sijan was born in Milwaukee, Wisconsin in 1942 from a Serbian father and Irish mother. He graduated from the United States Air Force Academy in 1965, and after attending pilot training, was assigned to the 366th Wing at Da Nang Air Base, Vietnam.

.
Read more ...

People Directory

Milan Oklopdžić - Mika Oklop

Anyone who knew Oklop's work would recognize his writing voice in one of his last messages to me, from San Francisco: "Things are tough, okay? WE WILL SURVIVE," followed by a link to a pop site called Hello I'm Special. In just this much we have his characteristic gee-whiz American idiom, the challenge to the reader to take "a straight answer"; the capital letters parodying the optimism he knew to be misplaced but felt; the brave-but-haunted air, the implied critique, the determined playfulness; the sense of the intrepid, the romantic, the contemporary, the doomed, the broken-hearted.

. Read more ...

Publishing

Sailors of the Sky

A conversation with Fr. Stamatis Skliris and Fr. Marko Rupnik on contemporary Christian art

In these timely conversations led by Fr. Radovan Bigovic, many issues are introduced that enable the contemporary reader to deepen and expand his or her understanding of the role of art in the life of the Church. Here we find answers to questions on the crisis of contemporary ecclesiastical art in West and East; the impact of Impressionism, Expressionism, Cubism, Surrealism and Abstract painting on contemporary ecclesiastical painting; and a consideration of the main distrinction between iconography and secular painting. The dialogue, while resolving some doubts about the difference between iconography, religious painting, and painting in general, reconciles the requirement to obey inconographic canons with the freedom essential to artistic creativity, demonstrating that obedience to the canons is not a threat to the vitatlity of iconography. Both artists illumine the role of prayer and ascetisicm in the art of iconography. They also mention curcial differences between iconography in the Orthodox Church and in Roman Catholicism. How important thse distinctions are when exploring the relationship between contemporary theology and art! In a time when postmodern "metaphysics' revitalizes every concept, these masters still believe that, to some extent, Post-Modernism adds to the revitatiztion of Christian art, stimulating questions about "artistic inspiration" and the essential asethetic categories of Christian painting. Their exceptionally wide, yet nonetheless deep, expertise assists their not-so-everday connections between theology, ar, and modern issues concerning society: "society" taken in its broader meaning as "civilization." Finally, the entire artistic project of Stamatis and Rupnik has important ecumenical implications that aswer a genuine longing for unity in the Christian word.

The text of this 94-page soft-bound book has been translated from the Serbian by Ivana Jakovljevic, Fr. Gregory Edwards, and Andrijana Krstic. Published by Sebastian Press, Western American Diocese of the Serbian Orthodox Church, Contemporary Christian Thought Series, number 7, First Edition, ISBN: 978-0-9719505-8-0

.