A great man is one who collects knowledge the way a bee collects honey and uses it to help people overcome the difficulties they endure - hunger, ignorance and disease!
- Nikola Tesla

Remember, remember always, that all of us, and you and I especially, are descended from immigrants and revolutionists.
- Franklin Roosevelt

While their territory has been devastated and their homes despoiled, the spirit of the Serbian people has not been broken.
- Woodrow Wilson

Mitchell Paige

Mitchell Paige was awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor for his heroic efforts on Oct. 26th, 1942 at Guadalcanal in the Solomon Islands.

Col. Paige was born in a small western Pennsylvania town of Charleroi, near the Ohio state line. His parents were Serb immigrants who came to the U.S. around the turn of the 20th century from the Serbian Vojna Krajina, which was back then a part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire. . One of the Paige family's proud possessions was a painting which depicted a Serbian soldier on a white horse at the Battle of Kosovo (1389). "It had the word 'Kosovo' inscribed at the bottom," Col. Paige recalls. Unfortunately, the painting was destroyed in a house fire, along with many other family treasures. But the spirit of Kosovo lived on.

Paige got a battlefield commission to second lieutenant and was awarded the Purple Heart, the Presidential Unit Citation, and the Victory Medal, in addition to the Congressional Medal of Honor.

All 33 men in Paige's unit were either killed or wounded during a Japanese attack. But Paige continued to man his machine gun until reinforcements arrived, preventing a regiment of between 2,500 to 3,000 Japanese troops from advancing.

Col. Paige was encouraged to write his memoirs by his very good friend, the Oscarwinning Hollywood star, Lee Marvin. When the soldier confessed to the actor that he was afraid such a book may seem as if he were patting himself on the back, Marvin replied: "How will we know if you don't tell us? Just sit down and write it out like it was." Col. Paige did. And now we know. A Marine Name Mitch is a story of a 'living legend,' as Gen. Bedard put it.


People Directory

Djordje Popovich

Djordje Rativoj Popovich was born May 5, 1942 in Belgrade, Serbia and passed away on September 8th, 2012 in Portland, Oregon, after a car accident.

Djordje R. Popovich immigrated to the United States in June 19th 1969 from Pula, Croatia. He lived in various places in the USA: Chicago, Santa Ana, and retired to Vancouver, WA. Mr. Popovic was a computer engineer and received high reviews from his employers.

He loved photography and computers. Djordje was very independent, he lived alone, yet took the best care he could of himself and his property, especially his yard. He had big blue eyes and could be very charming. The clerks at his bank were very fond of him.

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Publishing

On Divine Philanthropy

From Plato to John Chrysostom

by Bishop Danilo Krstic

This book describes the use of the notion of divine philanthropy from its first appearance in Aeschylos and Plato to the highly polyvalent use of it by John Chrysostom. Each page is marked by meticulous scholarship and great insight, lucidity of thought and expression. Bishop Danilo’s principal methodology in examining Chrysostom is a philological analysis of his works in order to grasp all the semantic shades of the concept of philanthropia throughout his vast literary output. The author overviews the observable development of the concept of philanthropia in a research that encompasses nearly seven centuries of literary sources. Peculiar theological connotations are studied in the uses of divine philanthropia both in the classical development from Aeschylos via Plutarch down to Libanius, Themistius of Byzantium and the Emperor Julian, as well as in the biblical development, especially from Philo and the New Testament through Origen and the Cappadocians to Chrysostom.

With this book, the author invites us to re-read Chrysostom’s golden pages on the ineffable philanthropy of God. "There is a modern ring in Chrysostom’s attempt to prove that we are loved—no matter who and where we are—and even infinitely loved, since our Friend and Lover is the infinite Triune God."

The victory of Chrysostom’s use of philanthropia meant the affirmation of ecclesial culture even at the level of Graeco-Roman culture. May we witness the same reality today in the modern techno-scientific world in which we live.