A great man is one who collects knowledge the way a bee collects honey and uses it to help people overcome the difficulties they endure - hunger, ignorance and disease!
- Nikola Tesla

Remember, remember always, that all of us, and you and I especially, are descended from immigrants and revolutionists.
- Franklin Roosevelt

While their territory has been devastated and their homes despoiled, the spirit of the Serbian people has not been broken.
- Woodrow Wilson

John David Brcin

brcin

A statue of a Sioux warrior on a rearing horse, proposed and modeled by Serbian-born sculptor John David Brcin (1899–1983), realized by Matthew Placzek in the late 1920s for the entrance to the Joslyn Memorial.

The biggest commission Brcin has executed — and one of the choicest of his era in the United States — was for the Joslyn Memorial, Omaha, a handsome marble building with picture galleries and an auditorium adaptable as a theater, given by Mrs. Sarah H. Joslyn to be the city’s center for painting, sculpture, music, literature, the drama and cultural arts in general. It is a $3,000,000 structure, dedicated to George A. Joslyn, a pioneer “patent-medicine man” of Omaha who became the city’s wealthiest capitalist, founded various enterprises, including the Western Newspaper Union, and died in 1918.

Brcin’s job was to design and execute for the exterior walls of the building eight panels depicting western subjects. Four of the panels are devoted to Indians, including a buffalo hunt; two, to pioneers; and to, to the activities of Joslyn himself. These panels, the largest of which are 16 by 5½ feet, are not chiseled in special albs but in the pink marble masonry of the walls of the museum. The work occupied Brcin during 1929-1932.
 
Curiously enough, the commission for the memorial wanted “modernistic” designs, and Brcin turned for his “stylization” to the traditions of his native Serbia, whose outstanding contemporary master is Mestrovic. Brcin’s birthplace is within 50 miles of Mestrovic’s.
 
They say, incidentally, back in Serbia (now Yugoslavia) that Mestrovic’s Syrian Indians in Chicago’s Grant Park are not Mestrovic’s original idea at all. He sketched real red-blooded, red American Indians, and submitted his sketches to the promoters of the Grant Park statuary. They were disappointed — they wanted something typically “Mestrovic” rather than typically “Indian” — Indians are vulgar and commonplace out here, while Mestrovic is just too, too exotic. So we have the Grant Park Indians.
 
In his Joslyn Memorial Indians, Brcin quite successfully hit a medium between the Indian of Buffalo Bill and the Indian of Mestrovic.
 
While still at work on the Joslyn Memorial, Brcin was given a hurry-up call in 1931 to do a statue of heroic size of Cyrus Hall McCormick, inventor of the reaper, to be set in bronze, on a granite base, on the campus of Washington and Lee University, Lexington, Va.
 
Some ides of the schedule of which the commissioners of the statue worked may be gathered from the fact that the date of dedication was fixed, and the unveiling speaker chosen, before a sculptor had been found to design and execute the work.
 
Brcin arose to the occasion and —though among the difficulties encountered was the necessity of traveling with a good-size model of Inventor Cyrus to get the okay of a venerable relative in California — delivered the finished bronze on time.
 
Brcin was born in a mountain village of 500 people: Gracac, Serbia, Aug. 13, 1899. That’s Napoleon’s birthday, too, he point out significantly, and Mestrovic’s.
 
His father died when he was 2, and he was brought up by an uncle, a talented farmer, mason, and carpenter who spent his winter evenings whittling out crucifixes and other wooden images with a pocket knife. At 6 or 7, John David was helping him whittle, quite satisfactorily, only preferring goats’ heads to sacred images.
 
But whittling wasn’t to be his job in life, his uncle and other members of the family decided. He was to be a professor. An older brother of Brcin’s had come to America and was working in a bank at Gary, Ind. He still works there. So pursuing the idea of being a professor, John Dave came, when 14, from the village of Gracac, where educational opportunities were few, to the more promising center of learning, Gary.
 
Without a word of English, he entered the Gary High School, having got that far along in the gymnasium in Serbia. Progress was discouragingly slow, considering the fact that instruction was in English, and Brcin admits that the mastery of a foreign language is no cinch for him.
 
He became conscious after a while that he was the biggest boy in his classes, grew embarrassed, and transferred the scene of his learning from the Gary High School to Valparaiso University, where he could mingle high school studies with college work.
 
But his ambitions to be a professor were slowly frittering away. He read somewhere — maybe in a Serbian journal — that Mestrovic, blossoming into fame, had begun life as a boy carving goats’ heads and rams’ heads. He read somewhere else — maybe in one of his laborious English school texts — that Abraham Lincoln, ideal American in the imagination of most foreigners, had begun life with no more money than John David had in his pocket at that very moment.
 
So Brcin began daydreaming of an “art career.” He came into Chicago at every chance to roam through the galleries of the Art Institute. He admits without blushing that “The Song of the Lark” fascinated him, along with the paintings by Millet, particularly his favorite of all, “Bringing Home the Newborn Calf” (which many of us are fearful will land ultimately in the basement to keep company with “The Song of the Lark”).
 
These pictures, he knows now, were a sort of antidote for the homesickness of an exiled European farm boy, but that doesn’t freeze the warm spot for them he still has in his heart. On one or two occasions, he recalls, the guard, after watching him parked for an hour or more in front of “Bringing Home the Newborn Calf,” urged him to “move on,” being perhaps afraid the overly absorbed young foreigner might have some sort of designs on the picture.
 
Millet’s example became an urge to the “career” Brcin was thinking out, along with the examples of Mestrovic and Lincoln. Millet was a peasant, too.
 
At the Art Institute as instructor in sculpture was a fellow Serbian, Albin Polasek. Brcin crossed the Rubicon. He quit Valparaiso and his ambitions to become a professor and entered the Art Institute of Chicago to be a sculptor.
 
His progress was so satisfactory that in his third year he won the Bryant Lathrop traveling scholarship, permitting him a year in Europe, expenses paid. However, he was not yet 21, not yet a full-fledged American citizen. He waited, and then in 1922 took his year in Europe, spending a month of it back home.
 
But his boyhood friends had grown up into utter strangers. His boyhood sweethearts were dead or married. He felt homesick for Chicago as once he had for Gracac, and there was no remedy like Millet’s “Bringing Home the Newborn Calf.”
 
Brcin returned after his year, spent mostly in France and Italy, entered the Art Institute school for a year’s “post graduate” work, married Blanche Moore, a talented painter in watercolor, modeled his head of “Mark Twain,” got Lorado Taft’s letter, and was on his way.

Source: Illinois Historical Art Project

brcin card

JOHN DAVID BRCIN CLIENT CARD – Bishop Firmilian’s Commission for two bronze busts of Bishop Nicholai one located at St Sava Monastery in Libertyville and the other at Holy Resurrection Cathedral in Chicago.

sv-vl-nikolaj


People Directory

Milan Panic

The story of Milan Panic is a very American story – emblematic of the people who made America what it is today. America is a nation of immigrants and Panic possesses the very qualities of first generation immigrants who turned America into an economic powerhouse: boundless optimism, a burning desire to succeed, and an enormous appetite for work.

Milan Panic is the founder and owner of MP Global Enterprises and Associates LLC, headquartered in Costa Mesa, California. The company focuses on both business and humanitarian issues around the world.

.
Read more ...

Publishing

Савремени еклисиолошки подсетник о Дијаспори

Историја и анализа тзв. „Америчког раскола“ (1963-1992) и предлози за његово превазилажење

Епископ Атанасије (Јевтић)

У издању Севастијан преса из Лос Анђелеса и Братства Св. Симона Мироточивог из Врњачке Бање, недавно је изашла нова књига Атанасија (Јевтића), умировљеног Владике херцеговачког, Савремени еклисиолошки подсетник о Дијаспори - Историја и анализа тзв. „Америчког раскола“ (1963-1992) и предлози за његово превазилажење.

Текст ове књиге је написан сада већ далеке 1990.године, и до данас био необјављен будући да је само за Синодске Оце Архијереје био намењен ради превазилажења тзв. „Америчког раскола“. Данас, када је тај српски раскол литургијски и административно превазиђен, сасвим је разумљиво и пожељно било да се овај текст предочи јавности.

На молбу Светог Архијерејског Синода, ондашњи јеромонах Атанасије је сва питања везана за болни раскол у српској дијаспори ставио под светлост православне Еклисиологије и Предања, што је био једини начин за њихово суочавање како би се дошло што ближе до зацељивања раскола. Читалац ће приметити како је он савесно и непристрасно проанализирао цело питање раскола и дао целисходне икономијске предлоге за његово решење. Ова књига је резултат његовог савесног христољубивог и црквољубивог рада.

Конкретан резултат Атанасијевог еклисиолошког предлога била је обнова евхаристијског општења и помирења које је постигнуто на празник Сретења Господњег, 15. фебруара 1992. године у Саборној Цркви у Београду, када су Српски Патријарх Павле и чланови Светог Архијерејског Сабора служили са Митрополитом Иринејем (Ковачевићем), дотадашњим епископом у расколу. Коначно, 21. маја 2009. године, Свети Архијерејски Сабор је донео одлуку и о коначном административном јединству Српске Цркве у Северној и Јужној Америци.

Истовремено, ова књига осветљава битно питање Дијаспоре. Дијаспора је пред Православну Цркву поставила два битна проблема: питање провере исправности нашег схватања Цркве, оног које се у последњим вековима код многих од нас усталило, и питање мисије Цркве у свету.

Књига је изашла са благословом Епископа новограчаничког и средњезападноамеричког Лонгина и Епископа западноамеричког Максима.

Књигу можете наручити по цени од $15 код:
Western American Diocese
1621 West Garvey Avenue Alhambra CA, 91803
847 571-3600, 626 289 9061, 626 284 1484 (fax), Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Visit our online store at http://westsrbdio.org/en/sebastian-press/sebastian-press-publications


Contemporary Ecclesiological Reminderon the Diaspora:
History and analysis of so called “American schism” (1963-1992) and recommendations for its overcoming

by Bishop Athanasius (Yevtich)

Recently, a new book by Athanasius (Yevtich), retired Bishop of Herzegovina, was published in Serbian by Sebastian Press of Los Angeles in cooperation with St. Simeon the Myrrh-streaming of Vrnjacka Banja.

This book was written in a now already distant year of 1990. This is its first publishing since the original intent was to have it available only for the hierarchs of the Holy Synod for the purpose of overcoming the so-called “American schism” within the Serbian diaspora. Presently, as the Serbian schism has been liturgically and administratively vanquished, it is understandable and desirable to have this valuable research available to the public.

At the request of the Holy Synod, back then hieromonk Atanasije acceded to collect all relevant documents in reference to painful schism in Serbian Diaspora, placing them in the light of Orthodox Ecclesiology and Holy Tradition, which was the only way to face it properly and bring it closer to healing.The readers will notice how Bishop Atanasije analyzed responsibly, and impartially the whole question of schism, and at the same time provided comprehensive, integral and thorough ecclesial economy, recomendations for solutions.This book is the result of his Christ-loving and Church-loving labor.

A tangible result of Atanasije's ecclesiological recommendation was the Eucharistic renewal, communion, and reconciliation which was established on the Feast of the Meeting of the Lord in the Temple, February 15, 1992. At the Cathedral in Belgrade, His Holiness Patriarch Paul and hierarchs of the Holy Episcopal Assembly celebrated for the first time together since the schism, with Metropolitan Iriney (Kovacevic), up until then, schismatic bishop in Diaspora.Finally, on May 21, 2009, the Holy Assembly made a decission about conclusive administrative unity of the Serbian Orthodox Church in North and South America.

In the same time this book reveals crucial question regarding Diaspora, because ecclesial organization of the Orthodox Church abroad presents itself with at least two problems: a) a check-up of our interpretation and comprehension of the Church, especifically of the last couple of centuries existing convictions, and b) a question of the Church mission in the World.

This book is published with the blessings of His Grace, Bishop Longin of New Gracanica - Midwestern America, and His Grace, Bishop Maxim of Western American Diocese, of the Serbian Orthodox Church for North and South America.

Price $15

Call us today with your order!
Western American Diocese
1621West Garvey Avenue Alhambra CA, 91803
847 571-3600, 626 289 9061, 626 284 1484 (fax), Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Visit our online store at http://westsrbdio.org/en/sebastian-press/sebastian-press-publications