A great man is one who collects knowledge the way a bee collects honey and uses it to help people overcome the difficulties they endure - hunger, ignorance and disease!
- Nikola Tesla

Remember, remember always, that all of us, and you and I especially, are descended from immigrants and revolutionists.
- Franklin Roosevelt

While their territory has been devastated and their homes despoiled, the spirit of the Serbian people has not been broken.
- Woodrow Wilson

Fionn Zarubica

Fionn Zarubica, a native of Los Angeles, California, attended the University of California, Santa Barbara as well as the University of California, Los Angeles. On the theatrical side Fionn has worked for over twenty years as a costume designer, designing costumes for theater, film, ballet, opera and television in the United States, Canada and Europe. On the museum side, she has worked at the Autry National Center, on the Southwest Museum of the American Indian Preservation Project, and in January of 2006 joined the department of Costume and Textiles of the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA), where she was responsible for the management and care of the museum's renowned and comprehensive costume and textile collections, and oversaw ongoing rotations of the permanent collection throughout the museum.

She contributed her skills for several exhibitions at LACMA including California Design, 1930-1965: Living in a Modern Way (2011); Fashioning Fashion: European Dress in Detail, 1700-1915 (2010); From the Spoon to the City: Design by Architects from LACMA’s Collection (2009); Art of Two Germanys/Cold War Cultures (2009) and Breaking the Mode: Contemporary Fashion from the Permanent Collection (2006) as well as the critically acclaimed Los Angeles Goes Live: Performance Art in Southern California 1970-1983 (LACE 2011) part of the Getty’s Pacific Standard Time exhibition series. In addition to serving as Managing Partner of Fionn Zarubica & Associates, Director of the Fionn Zarubica Foundation For Art And Culture in Serbia and Director of Fionn Zarubica Learn, Fionn is directing the Collections Management Certification Program in Serbia and is an instructor at the Costume and Textiles Collections Management Certificate Program at California State University Long Beach, The College of Continuing and Professional Education.

Source: Official Web Site


People Directory

Mihajlo D. Mesarović

Mihajlo D. Mesarovic (Serbian: Mihajlo D. Mesarović, Serbian Cyrillic: Михајло Д. Месаровић; born July 2, 1928) is a Serbian scientist, who is a professor of Systems Engineering and Mathematics at Case Western Reserve University. Mesarovic has been a pioneer in the field of systems theory, he was UNESCO Scientific Advisor on Global change and also a member of the Club of Rome.

Mihajlo D. Mesarović was born on July 2nd, 1928 in Zrenjanin, Yugoslavia. He was awarded the B.S. from the University of Belgrade Faculty of Electrical Engineering in 1951. In 1955 he received a Ph.D. in Technical sciences from the Serbian Academy of Sciences and Arts.

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Publishing

On Divine Philanthropy

From Plato to John Chrysostom

by Bishop Danilo Krstic

This book describes the use of the notion of divine philanthropy from its first appearance in Aeschylos and Plato to the highly polyvalent use of it by John Chrysostom. Each page is marked by meticulous scholarship and great insight, lucidity of thought and expression. Bishop Danilo’s principal methodology in examining Chrysostom is a philological analysis of his works in order to grasp all the semantic shades of the concept of philanthropia throughout his vast literary output. The author overviews the observable development of the concept of philanthropia in a research that encompasses nearly seven centuries of literary sources. Peculiar theological connotations are studied in the uses of divine philanthropia both in the classical development from Aeschylos via Plutarch down to Libanius, Themistius of Byzantium and the Emperor Julian, as well as in the biblical development, especially from Philo and the New Testament through Origen and the Cappadocians to Chrysostom.

With this book, the author invites us to re-read Chrysostom’s golden pages on the ineffable philanthropy of God. "There is a modern ring in Chrysostom’s attempt to prove that we are loved—no matter who and where we are—and even infinitely loved, since our Friend and Lover is the infinite Triune God."

The victory of Chrysostom’s use of philanthropia meant the affirmation of ecclesial culture even at the level of Graeco-Roman culture. May we witness the same reality today in the modern techno-scientific world in which we live.