A great man is one who collects knowledge the way a bee collects honey and uses it to help people overcome the difficulties they endure - hunger, ignorance and disease!
- Nikola Tesla

Remember, remember always, that all of us, and you and I especially, are descended from immigrants and revolutionists.
- Franklin Roosevelt

While their territory has been devastated and their homes despoiled, the spirit of the Serbian people has not been broken.
- Woodrow Wilson

Zoran Mojsilov

Zoran Mojsilov was born in Belgrade, Yugoslavia in 1955. As a small child, he carved his own toys out of scrap wood and was adept at drawing and painting. In early adolescence he began Greco-Roman wrestling and continued this practice into his mid-20’s. He credits the discipline of training, an understanding of the skeletal muscular forms in the human body, and the spirit of competition in sports and life as primary factors for creating art today.

Mojsilov left Belgrade in 1983 for Paris, France to test his artistic credibility. In 1984, he met Ilene Krug, an American Artist, at Association Confluences. After two productive years there, they decided to move to Minneapolis in 1986.

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Once in Minneapolis, Mojsilov made large scale sculptures in wood using the assemblage process that he had started in Paris. His career developed steadily with recognition from local and national grants such as the McKnight Artist Fellowship in 1987, the Socrates Sculpture Park / Athena Foundation Award in 1988 and 1990, the Pollack-Krasner Foundation Artist Fellowship in 1990, the Minnesota State Arts Board Artist Assistance Fellowship in 1994, the Bush Foundation Artist Fellowship in 1996, and the Jerome Foundation, Travel and Study Grant in 1993 and 2001.

Mojsilov had a sculptural break-through in 1990 when he was an artist-in-residence at La Vie des Formes in Chalon-sur-Saône, France. In this French shipyard, he took up welding and made sculptures in stone and steel. Mojsilov continues to use these durable materials in his public art projects to this day. They include: the Metropolitan Regional Arts Council High Bridge Park, St. Paul in 1995, the Minneapolis Arts Commission, Camden Gateway Project, Minneapolis in 1996, the Minnesota Percent for Art in Public Places, Rochester Community & Technical College in 1997; the Dallas Area Rapid Transit, Dallas TX in 1998; Wisconsin Percent for Art in Public Places, U of WI at Stevens Point WI in 1999; Kirchbak Sculpture Garden, Richfield MN in 2000; North Dakota Museum of Art, Grand Forks ND in 2000; Spirit of Milwaukee Neighborhood Millennium Art Initiative, Milwaukee WI in 2000; Nebraska Percent for Art in Public Places at Wayne State College in Wayne NE in 2002; the Anderson Center for Interdisciplinary Studies in Red Wing MN in 2006.

From: Bockley Gallery


People Directory

Veljko Jovanovic

Born in Valjevo, Serbia.

Technical Group Supervisor 
Processing Algorithms and Calibration Engineering
Instrument Software and Science Data Systems
Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California

Research Interests

The development of systems for automated digital mapping, image exploitation and analysis, and instrument geometric calibration

Projects

Multi-Angle Imaging Spectro-Radiometer (MISR)
The Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) instrument provides a unique opportunity for studying the ecology and climate of Earth through the acquisition of global multiangle imagery on the daylit side of Earth.

Planetary Robotics Vision Ground Processing ( PRoVisG)
Planetary Robotics Vision Ground Processing ( PRoVisG) will build a unified European framework for Robotic Vision Ground Processing.

PROBA-V
Proba-V is a miniaturized ESA satellite tasked with a full-scale mission: to map land cover and vegetation growth across the entire planet every two days.

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Read more ...

Publishing

Knowing the Purpose of Creation through the Resurrection

Proceedings of the Symposium on St. Maximus the Confessor

The present volume is a collection of presentations delivered at the St Maximus the Confessor International Symposium held in Belgrade at the University of Belgrade from 18 to 21 October 2012. The Belgrade Symposium brought together the following speakers: Demetrios Bathrellos, Grigory Benevitch, Calinic Berger, Paul Blowers, David Bradshaw, Adam Cooper, Brian Daley, Paul Gavrilyuk, Atanasije Jevtić, Joshua Lollar, Andrew Louth, John Panteleimon Manoussakis, Maximos of Simonopetra, Ignatije Midić, Pascal Mueller-Jourdan, Alexei Nesteruk, Aristotle Papanikolaou, George Parsenios, Philipp Gabriel Renczes, Nino Sakvarelidze, Torstein Tollefsen, George Varvatsoulias, Maxim Vasiljević, Christos Yannaras, and John Zizioulas. The papers and discussions in this volume of the proceedings of the Belgrade Symposium amply attest to the reputation of Saint Maximus the Confessor as the most universal spirit of the seventh century, and perhaps the greatest thinker of the Church. Twenty eight studies have been gathered in the present volume, which is organized into eight chapters, each of them corresponding to the proceedings of the Symposium, all of which are of intense interest and importance. Chapter One brings to light new evidence regarding the sources, influences, and appropriations of St Maximus’ teaching. His mediatorial role as one of the few genuinely ecumenical theologians of the patristic era is acknowledged and affirmed. Chapter Two offers some crucial clarifications on the relationship between person, nature, and freedom. In Chapter Three we find substantial discussion on body, pathos, love, eros, etc. New interpretive paradigms and insights are proposed in Chapter Four, while the next chapter presents the Confessor’s cosmological perspective in light of modern scientific discoveries. Some important ontological and ecclesiological issues are discussed in Chapter Six, while in Chapter Seven we are able to see what contemporary synthesis is possible through St Maximus’ thought. Chapter Eight offers further readings by engaging younger scholars who did not present their papers at the conference but whose studies were accepted by the organizers. In the final paper we find an important overview of the Symposium with a description of the conference’s flow. In an age of plurality and division, it is particularly important to know what our Tradition—shaped by the Fathers—can teach us. In any such endeavor, Saint Maximus the Confessor stands out as the most important theologian of the so-called Byzantine period. Yet his theology, assimilated and incorporated by Tradition, has relevance beyond any single historical period; in fact, the Confessor’s efforts to mediate between East and West distinguish his work as vital for contemporary theological discourse.