A great man is one who collects knowledge the way a bee collects honey and uses it to help people overcome the difficulties they endure - hunger, ignorance and disease!
- Nikola Tesla

Remember, remember always, that all of us, and you and I especially, are descended from immigrants and revolutionists.
- Franklin Roosevelt

While their territory has been devastated and their homes despoiled, the spirit of the Serbian people has not been broken.
- Woodrow Wilson

Željka Cvjetan Gortinski

Željka Cvjetan Gortinski, an actress, is a member of the Society of Dramatic Artists of Serbia and the Afta - SAG Union. 

She earned a Bachelor of Arts in acting, in 1984, at the University of Arts, Belgrade.

During her second year at the University, she started her professional career as an actress in many stage, film, radio and TV productions and became a permanent member of a repertory theater company, “Belgrade Drama Theater.”. Zeljka was fortunate to work with some of the greatest directors in the former Yugoslavia: Dusan Jovanovic, Slobodan Unkovski, Dejan Mijac, and Egon Savin. She starred in successful TV mini series: “The Forgotten Ones”, “House of Gloom” and “The Portrait of Ilija Pevac” as well as in feature films, “Oktoberfest”, “Odyssey Over Igman” and “The Little Carrot You Do Not Grow Nicely.” In 1991, Ms Gortinski and her family moved to California where she has continued her acting career and education, having earned a Master’s Degree in Theater from the California State University, Los Angeles in 1997.

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Lolita Davidovich

Lolita Davidovich (Serbian: Лолита Давидовић; born July 15, 1961) is a Canadian film and television actress.

Davidovich was born in London, Ontario, the daughter of immigrants from Yugoslavia. Her father was from Belgrade, the capital of Serbia, and her mother was from Slovenia; she spoke only Serbian during her early years. She studied at the Herbert Berghof Studio in New York.

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Jesus Christ Is The Same Yesterday Today And Unto the Ages

In this latest and, in every respect, meaningful study, Bishop Athanasius, in the manner of the Holy Fathers, and firmly relying upon the Apostles John and Paul, argues that the Old Testament name of God, “YHWH,” a revealed to Moses at Sinai, was translated by both Apostles (both being Hebrews) into the language of the New Testament in a completely original and articulate manner.  In this sense, they do not follow the Septuagint, in which the name, “YHWH,” appears together with the phrase “the one who is”, a word which is, in a certain sense, a philosophical-ontological translation (that term would undoubtedly become significant for the conversion of the Greeks in the Gospels).  The two Apostles, rather, translate this in a providential, historical-eschatological, i.e. in a specifically Christological sense.  Thus, John carries the word “YHWH” over with “the One Who Is, Who was and Who is to Come” (Rev. 1:8 & 22…), while for Paul “Jesus Christ is the Same Yesterday, Today and Unto the Ages” (Heb. 13:8).