A great man is one who collects knowledge the way a bee collects honey and uses it to help people overcome the difficulties they endure - hunger, ignorance and disease!
- Nikola Tesla

Remember, remember always, that all of us, and you and I especially, are descended from immigrants and revolutionists.
- Franklin Roosevelt

While their territory has been devastated and their homes despoiled, the spirit of the Serbian people has not been broken.
- Woodrow Wilson

John Bosnitch

John Bosnitch (born February 15, 1961 in Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada) is a Canadian journalist, consultant and political activist of Serbian descent. He's also Bureau Chief of The InterMedia Center News Agency located in Tokyo, Japan.

John Bosnitch volunteered to help 11th World Chess Champion Bobby Fischer (March 9, 1943 – January 17, 2008) after Fischer was detained in Japan in 2004. The U.S. Bush Administration had told Japanese authorities that it had "revoked" Fischer's passport to try to bring him to trial in the United States for playing in a World Chess Championship rematch in Yugoslavia in 1992 in alleged violation of U.S. presidential sanctions against economic activity with Yugoslavia.

Japanese immigration authorities then held Fischer in Tokyo's Narita Airport detention center for 16 days after refusing to let him leave the country due to an alleged passport violation, before transferring him to a long-term detention center pending deportation to the United States. Bosnitch set up the "Committee to Free Bobby Fischer" after visiting Fischer in the Narita Airport detention center. John Bosnitch argued for and won the right to participate as a friend of the court before the Immigration Bureau tribunal charged with handling Fischer's deportation. Bosnitch filibustered for more than 24 hours through two deportation hearings and then worked to legally block the Japanese Immigration Bureau's efforts to deport Fischer to the United States, coordinating a 9-month legal and public relations 'Free Bobby Fischer' campaign until Fischer's eventual release. Fischer was, after receiving full Icelandic citizenship, allowed to leave for Iceland, instead of being deported to the US.

Shortly before Fischer's departure for Iceland, on March 23, 2005, Bosnitch and Fischer appeared on the BBC World Service, via a voice link to Bosnitch's mobile telephone at the Tokyo airport. Bosnitch stated that Fischer would never play traditional chess again. Igor Stevanovic made a documentary film about chess legend Bobby Fischer through the eyes of his Serbian friends, chess opponents and acquaintances titled "Requiem for Bobby Fischer" (Opelo za Bobija Fisera, 2009) featuring John Bosnitch.

John Bosnitch also appears in the documentary "Me & Bobby Fischer" by Icelandic filmmaker Fridrik Gudmundsson, that focuses on the role played by a committee of Icelandic activists who joined the battle to save Bobby Fischer by fighting to gain sanctuary for him in Iceland.

Source: Wikipedia


People Directory

Milica Bakić-Hayden

Lecturer
PhD, University of Chicago, 1997

2612 Cathedral of Learning
412.624.5989, e-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Fields
Religion and society in the Balkans and South Asia, topics in comparative religion

Teaching
Eastern Orthodoxy, Mysticism East and East, Saints East and West, Religions of India I, Religions of India II: Storytelling as a Religious Form, Christian-Muslim Relations

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Publishing

My Brother's Keeper

by Fr. Radovan Bigovic

Rare are the books of Orthodox Christian authors that deal with the subject of politics in a comprehensive way. It is taken for granted that politics has to do with the secularized (legal) protection of human rights (a reproduction of the philosophy of the Enlightenment), within the political system of so-called "representative democracy", which is limited mostly to social utility or to the conventional rules of human relations. Most Christians look at politics and democracy as unrelated with their experience of the Church herself, which abides both in history and in the Kingdom, the eschaton. Today, the commercialization of politics—its submission to the laws of publicity and the brainwashing of the masses—has literally abolished the "representative" parliamentary system. So, why bother with politics when every citizen of so-called developed societies has a direct everyday experience of the rapid decline and alienation of the fundamental aspects of modernity?

In the Orthodox milieu, Christos Yannaras has highlighted the conception of the social and political event that is borne by the Orthodox ecclesiastical tradition, which entails a personalistic (assumes an infinite value of the human person as opposed to Western utilitarian individualism) and relational approach. Fr Radovan Bigovic follows this approach. In this book, the reader will find a faithful engagement with the liturgical and patristic traditions, with contemporary thinkers, Orthodox and non-Orthodox, all in conversation with political science and philosophy. As an excellent Orthodox theologian and a proponent of dialogue, rooted in the catholic (holistic) being of the Orthodox Church and of his Serbian people, Fr Radovan offers a methodology that encompasses the above-mentioned concerns and quests.