A great man is one who collects knowledge the way a bee collects honey and uses it to help people overcome the difficulties they endure - hunger, ignorance and disease!
- Nikola Tesla

Remember, remember always, that all of us, and you and I especially, are descended from immigrants and revolutionists.
- Franklin Roosevelt

While their territory has been devastated and their homes despoiled, the spirit of the Serbian people has not been broken.
- Woodrow Wilson

Milica Paranosic

Critically acclaimed composer Milica Paranosic has established herself as one of New York’s finest and most daring composers, performance artists, producers, and technologists. Her music was described as “Amazing…astonishing,” (The New York Times), “Like liquor-filled pralines,” (Germany’s Morgenpost), and “A painter, musical Jackson Pollack,” (SEAMUS). Milica’s works range from one-woman multimedia shows and sound installations to operatic and symphonic works. Inspired by her travels and international collaborations, Milica imaginatively incorporates music of her Serbian homeland in addition to cross-continental muses such as Brazil, Ghana and China, always striving to create new sound worlds in which contrasting concepts vividly coexist in unique textures.

Milica is recipient of many honors and awards; her work was commissioned by major NYC organizations such as American Composers Orchestra, New Juilliard Ensemble, VisionIntoArt and Buglisi Dance Theater and has appeared at stages of Symphony Space, Zankel Hall/Carnegie, Alice Tully Hall/Lincoln Center, BAM café, Bohemian National Hall and many others. International and intercontinental highlights include BEMUS (Belgrade, Serbia), EtnaFest (Catania, Italy) and Internacional De Música Contemporânea Ppgmus-Ufba, (Bahia, Brazil). Her recent commission by the American Composers Orchestra's for an opener of their 2012-13 season at the Carnegie’s Zankel Hall, was co-sponsored by the LVMH Moët Hennessy • Louis Vuitton.

Milica’s Film scores include original score for Cure by Andrea Staka and Prokleta je Amerika by Boban Skerlic.

Since 1995, Milica has been on the music faculty of The Juilliard School where she co-founded and produced Beyond the Machine, Juilliard’s Festival of Electronic Music. She has taught and created curricula in varied settings such as Belgrade Music University, San Diego State University, Franklin Marshall College, Brotherhood Sister Sol, and 92nd Street Y. She maintains an active private teaching studio, working with professional musicians and beginners, ranging from 5 to 93. Furthering her deep commitment to education and outreach, Milica founded Give to Grow, an education initiative, which brings music technology to developing communities in Ghana.

Milica is a current associate director of Composers Concordance, advisory board member at Composers Now and Miolina, music director of Gallery MC, and founder and CEO of Paracademia LLC and ifounder and executive director a non-profit for Music and Arts educaiton and perfomance, Paracademia Center, Inc.

Source: Official Web Site


People Directory

Marta Milosevic-Brankovic

Marta Milosevic-Brankovic was born in Belgrade, Serbia. She has captured the attention of audience and critics alike since her concerto debut at Ganz Rudolph Hall in Chicago in 2005 where one of the most famous pianists alive, Abbey Simon (Professor at the Juilliard School) personally attended the concert and highly acclaimed her performance of Bach and Chopin. At the age of six Marta took her first piano lesson and already a year later she played her first public concert. She was 21 when she graduated at the Music Art Academy in Belgrade as the youngest student with the highest GPA in the generation. She received her early musical training in class of Russian Professor Jakuthon Mlhailovich, a graduate from the Moscow Conservatory. At the same time she has also completed Media studies at the University of Art in Belgrade. During her studies, she worked with eminent artists from her country and auended a number of piano master courses of the following Professors: Sijavus Gadzijev (Moscow). Tamara Stefanovic (Koeln). Dr. David Abot (Zurich-New York), Dr. Tatjana Rankovich (New York), Dr. Omitry Rachmanov (Chicago-New York) and many others.

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Knowing the Purpose of Creation through the Resurrection

Proceedings of the Symposium on St. Maximus the Confessor

The present volume is a collection of presentations delivered at the St Maximus the Confessor International Symposium held in Belgrade at the University of Belgrade from 18 to 21 October 2012. The Belgrade Symposium brought together the following speakers: Demetrios Bathrellos, Grigory Benevitch, Calinic Berger, Paul Blowers, David Bradshaw, Adam Cooper, Brian Daley, Paul Gavrilyuk, Atanasije Jevtić, Joshua Lollar, Andrew Louth, John Panteleimon Manoussakis, Maximos of Simonopetra, Ignatije Midić, Pascal Mueller-Jourdan, Alexei Nesteruk, Aristotle Papanikolaou, George Parsenios, Philipp Gabriel Renczes, Nino Sakvarelidze, Torstein Tollefsen, George Varvatsoulias, Maxim Vasiljević, Christos Yannaras, and John Zizioulas. The papers and discussions in this volume of the proceedings of the Belgrade Symposium amply attest to the reputation of Saint Maximus the Confessor as the most universal spirit of the seventh century, and perhaps the greatest thinker of the Church. Twenty eight studies have been gathered in the present volume, which is organized into eight chapters, each of them corresponding to the proceedings of the Symposium, all of which are of intense interest and importance. Chapter One brings to light new evidence regarding the sources, influences, and appropriations of St Maximus’ teaching. His mediatorial role as one of the few genuinely ecumenical theologians of the patristic era is acknowledged and affirmed. Chapter Two offers some crucial clarifications on the relationship between person, nature, and freedom. In Chapter Three we find substantial discussion on body, pathos, love, eros, etc. New interpretive paradigms and insights are proposed in Chapter Four, while the next chapter presents the Confessor’s cosmological perspective in light of modern scientific discoveries. Some important ontological and ecclesiological issues are discussed in Chapter Six, while in Chapter Seven we are able to see what contemporary synthesis is possible through St Maximus’ thought. Chapter Eight offers further readings by engaging younger scholars who did not present their papers at the conference but whose studies were accepted by the organizers. In the final paper we find an important overview of the Symposium with a description of the conference’s flow. In an age of plurality and division, it is particularly important to know what our Tradition—shaped by the Fathers—can teach us. In any such endeavor, Saint Maximus the Confessor stands out as the most important theologian of the so-called Byzantine period. Yet his theology, assimilated and incorporated by Tradition, has relevance beyond any single historical period; in fact, the Confessor’s efforts to mediate between East and West distinguish his work as vital for contemporary theological discourse.