A great man is one who collects knowledge the way a bee collects honey and uses it to help people overcome the difficulties they endure - hunger, ignorance and disease!
- Nikola Tesla

Remember, remember always, that all of us, and you and I especially, are descended from immigrants and revolutionists.
- Franklin Roosevelt

While their territory has been devastated and their homes despoiled, the spirit of the Serbian people has not been broken.
- Woodrow Wilson

Decani Monastery Relief Fund

The Decani Monastery Relief Fund (DMRF) is a non-profit organization committed to assisting the people of Kosovo/ Metohija through the Decani Monastery located in Kosovo, by providing funds that may be used in ways which include but are not limited to the following:

  • Providing daily lunches to schools.
  • Providing shoes and clothing for youth.
  • Supporting soup kitchens and bakeries.
  • Rebuilding of seminaries, monasteries, and churches in the region.
  • Providing humanitarian aid to refugee centers.
  • Providing for special needs of the elderly.
  • Paying electric bills.
  • Providing firewood.
  • Financing necessary medical and surgical procedures.
  • Helping to purchase farm equipment and livestock.
  • Providing scholarships to the University of Northern Kosovo when applicable.
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These are just some examples of how donations are used after being channeled through the DMRF directly to the monastery. Ultimately the uses of these funds are determined by the Decani Monastery itself and are based purely upon necessity.



Source: The Decani Monastery Relief Fund


People Directory

Milana Mim Karlo Bizic

Milana ("Mim") Karlo Bizic earned a B.S. degree in three (3) years from the University of Pittsburgh where she had a four-year scholarship; a Master's Degree in 1967; School Library Certification in 1970; and Gifted and Talented Certification in 1981. Her professional experience includes teaching all Elementary grade level students K-6;  Teaching Graduate level courses for Penn State University (Beaver Campus for nine years until 1994), Carlow College and the Allegheny Intermediate Unit, where she taught fellow educators how to creatively integrate computers into their curriculums across all disciplines and all grade levels, K-12; working as a Supervisor of Student Teachers for the University of Pittsburgh (Pitt) after she retired from working 40+ years teaching in the public schools, most notably for Quaker Valley School District.

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Publishing

On Divine Philanthropy

From Plato to John Chrysostom

by Bishop Danilo Krstic

This book describes the use of the notion of divine philanthropy from its first appearance in Aeschylos and Plato to the highly polyvalent use of it by John Chrysostom. Each page is marked by meticulous scholarship and great insight, lucidity of thought and expression. Bishop Danilo’s principal methodology in examining Chrysostom is a philological analysis of his works in order to grasp all the semantic shades of the concept of philanthropia throughout his vast literary output. The author overviews the observable development of the concept of philanthropia in a research that encompasses nearly seven centuries of literary sources. Peculiar theological connotations are studied in the uses of divine philanthropia both in the classical development from Aeschylos via Plutarch down to Libanius, Themistius of Byzantium and the Emperor Julian, as well as in the biblical development, especially from Philo and the New Testament through Origen and the Cappadocians to Chrysostom.

With this book, the author invites us to re-read Chrysostom’s golden pages on the ineffable philanthropy of God. "There is a modern ring in Chrysostom’s attempt to prove that we are loved—no matter who and where we are—and even infinitely loved, since our Friend and Lover is the infinite Triune God."

The victory of Chrysostom’s use of philanthropia meant the affirmation of ecclesial culture even at the level of Graeco-Roman culture. May we witness the same reality today in the modern techno-scientific world in which we live.