A great man is one who collects knowledge the way a bee collects honey and uses it to help people overcome the difficulties they endure - hunger, ignorance and disease!
- Nikola Tesla

Remember, remember always, that all of us, and you and I especially, are descended from immigrants and revolutionists.
- Franklin Roosevelt

While their territory has been devastated and their homes despoiled, the spirit of the Serbian people has not been broken.
- Woodrow Wilson

Bridges to Serbia

SupportSerbia.com is run by a Serbian-American family living in Honolulu and Washington, D.C. After visiting Serbia for the first time in 2011, we wanted to share what we had seen in Serbia with other Serbian-Americans and the world!

What we saw:

  • a heritage we are proud of;
  • a vibrant culture;
  • beautiful people with warm hearts;
  • and ways in which we and other Serbian-Americans can easily help people living in that country.
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Explore our website, catch up on Serbian news, make use of some online resources, and get involved. Enjoy!

Mission Statement

Bridges to Serbia aims to connect Serbian-Americans and other charitable individuals and organizations to humanitarian projects in Serbia through events, travel, student exchanges, fundraising, and development projects. The organization especially emphasizes the involvement of individuals with Serbian or Balkan heritage in these projects.

You can find Bridges to Serbia on Facebook by clicking here.


People Directory

George Glamack

George Gregory Glamack (June 7, 1919 – March 10, 1987) (born in Johnstown, Pennsylvania) was an American basketball player of Serbian origin, from Lika. A 6'6" forward-center, Glamack attended the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Glamack, an All-American in 1940 and 1941, was nicknamed the Blind Bomber because he was an inspiration to those fond of individuals overcoming adversity. The Spaulding Guide noted that "Glamack, who is ambididextrous when on the court, is also so nearsighted that the ball is merely a dim object, but apparently he never looked where he was shooting, depending upon his sense of distance and direction." The secret of "The Blind Bomber" was looking at the black lines on the court. By doing that he knew where he was in reference to the basket and measure the shot.

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Publishing

Notes On Ecumenism

Written in 1972 by St. Abba Justin Popovich, edited by Bishop Athanasius Yevtich, translated from Serbian by Aleksandra Stojanovich, and proofread by Fr Miroljub Ruzich

Abba Justin’s manuscript legacy (on which Bishop Athanasius have been working for a couple of years preparing an edition of The Complete Works ), also includes a parcel of sheets/small sheets of paper (in the 1/4 A4 size) with the notes on Ecumenism (written in pencil and dating from the period when he was working on his book “The Orthodox Church and Ecumenism”; there are also references to the writings of St. Bishop Nikolai [Velimirovich], short excerpts copied from his Sermons, some of which were quoted in the book).

The editor presents the Notes authentically, as he has found them in the manuscripts (his words inserted in the text, as clarification, are put between the slashes /…/; all the footnotes are ours).—In the appendix are present the facsimiles of the majority of Abba’s Notes which were supposed to be included in his book On Ecumenism (written in haste then, but now significantly supplemented with these Notes. The Notes make evident the full extent of Justin’s profundity as a theologian and ecclesiologist of the authentic Orthodoxy).—The real Justin is present in these Notes: by his original language, style, literature, polemics, philosophy, theology, and above all by his confession of the God-man Christ and His Church. He confesses his faith, tradition, experience and his perspective on man, on the world and on Europe—invariably in the Church and from the Church, in the God-man Christ and from Him, just as he did in all of his writings and in his entire life and theologizing.