A great man is one who collects knowledge the way a bee collects honey and uses it to help people overcome the difficulties they endure - hunger, ignorance and disease!
- Nikola Tesla

Remember, remember always, that all of us, and you and I especially, are descended from immigrants and revolutionists.
- Franklin Roosevelt

While their territory has been devastated and their homes despoiled, the spirit of the Serbian people has not been broken.
- Woodrow Wilson

About the Staff

Everyone who works at Serb World U.S.A. loves a good story, especially one about Serbs in America, but they have come to the magazine from varied professions with unique perspectives. All share an enthusiasm not only for their own work but also for each other's. Together they explore the cultural world of Serbs and produce a magazine enjoyed by over 20,000 others.

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They can scan materials in seven languages — English, French, German, Russian, Serbo-Croatian, and Spanish. Most are American Serbs; some are not Serbs at all.

Bowker's Magazines for Libraries (1989) noted Serb World U.S.A.'squality, variety, and originality: 'It has maintained its editorial record as the best of its kind... the well-illustrated pages can feature a piece on making 'Serbian Spirits,' another way of talking about sljivovica. The dozen articles move from heroes of the O.S.S. to all-American Serb, Bronco Kosanovich."

Mary Nicklanovich Hart, Editor/Publisher (M.A. 1974, B.A. 1970, Phi Beta Kappa)
began editing and publishing Serb World U.S.A. in 1984. Prior to that, she had spent several years researching early South Slav immigration to the United States, published a few journal articles, and was several times a featured speaker on the subject. Her early works are based on primary documents and oral history, and much of that focused on Serbs in the American West—Bisbee and Globe in Arizona; Galveston, Texas; and White Pine County, Nevada.
In the magazine, she has turned to cultural topics which include an exploration of the Sokol movement, a description of The Slav Epic by Alphonse Mucha, and the development of "An Alphabet for the Slavs," the story of Cyrillic. In addition, she is the magazine's primary translator of works from Serbo-Croatian into English for the occasional bi-lingual format.
Among her major translations are the 1992, original English version of Dr. Stojan Lazarevic's History of the Belgrade Choral Society; numerous excerpts from Dr. Jovan Cvijic's (1865-1927) studies of the Balkan Peninsula; and English renderings of over 100 "Letters from Home" (1903-1945) contained in the rare Kosich "Srbin iz Like"Collection.

George Kosich, Chief Staff Writer
joined the magazine in 1984 just after he retired from a 30-year career as an executive in the brewing industry. He is a native of Wisconsin and long-time Milwaukee resident now living in Tucson.
His over 60 feature articles are proof of his wide interest in American Serbs, especially young professionals. He has interviewed artists, athletes, attorneys, judges, and scientists from coast to coast. He also took an in-depth look at Maximilian's Miramar and at cilim weaving in Old Serbia.
However, in the spring of 1985, he made history when he wrote "Mileva Marich of Novi Sad," one of the first accounts in English to conclude that Mileva Marich Einstein was a well-educated scientist in her own right. George Kosich is the master of the short article—focused, sharp, and witty.

Michael D. Nicklanovich, Feature Writer (M.S. 1966, B.S. 1964)
is an extraordinary writer at home with countless subjects. In addition to a book of poetry and two science textbooks, he began writing for the magazine while he was a professor of biology in Miami, Florida. He has since retired.
His over 100 feature articles extend from a 5-part series on Serbia in World War I to "Michael the Heavenly Warrior." Following the rivers and mountains, he has explored the Balkan peninsula. Tracing the origins of foods and herbs, he has discovered many secrets of the region.
In 1988, he brought the "Pirates of the Adriatic," the history of the Uskoks, and the "Serbs of No Man's Land," the history of the Military Frontier, to Serb World U.S.A.readers. In 1990 and in 1993, he spotlighted American Serbs who had won Pulitzers. The Montenegrin connections to the 'Merry Widow' and the Serbian route of the Orient Express were popular favorites as is his series on America's steel mill towns.

Philip D. Hart, Production Manager, Writer (M.A. 1975, B.A. 1970)
is one production manager who does everything from typesetting and design to writing feature stories. His original layouts are masterful, an expert selection of sharp images, the effective use of screens and color, and the drawing of original maps.
He is also a professional historian and former museum administrator, and several of his over 50 articles have found their way into bibliographies throughout the country. He began with a ground-breaking series on the American Serbs in the OSS. His article on Indiana Serb Matt Leach added an important chapter to the John Dillinger saga, and his series on the changing maps of the Balkans have included "Balkan Tightrope," "Flash Point," "Revolt in the Pashalik," and the "Treacherous Road to Autonomy."

Milan Opacich, Music Historian
is an all-around tamburitza master—a performer, an instrument builder, a teacher, a historian, and a writer—a man who makes both beautiful music and beautiful tamburitzas. Through his fifty years of experience, research, and writing, he has documented the contributions of countless musicians to the 100-year-old tamburitza tradition in the New World. Over 100 of his articles have appeared in his regular column, "Milan Opacich Presents," in Serb World U.S.A. and in his book Tamburitza America available through Black Mountain Publishers.

Mary Nicklanovich, Recipe Specialist
made her first cake when she was just 8 years old, and her mother, Marta, gave her free reign in the kitchen. That was over 70 years ago, and she has loved cooking ever since. In fact, she married a chef, Andrew M. Nicklanovich, and spent over forty years in the restaurant business. She knows Serbian food, of course, but is just as at home with chili or apple pie.
Over the past 22 years, she has done what few great cooks would ever do: revealed her favorite recipes and treasured secrets. Most of her Serbian dishes were unwritten, taught to her by her mother and close friends. The recipes she has published in Serb World U.S.A. are all authentic. Each was prepared according to exact measurements and then photographed. They are guaranteed, kitchen-tested, and comprise an extraordinary record of the finest Serb cooking.

Barbara Malczewski, Illustrator
was a scientific illustrator in her native Krakow, Poland. Since coming to America in the early 1980’s, she has branched out into original oils, exhibit design—and illustrating Serb World U.S.A.'s charming fairy tales. She draws on research and her own knowledge of Slavic folklore, plus a love of the fantastic, to bring the imaginary world of Serbian folk tales to life.

Holly Clark, Circulation Manager (M. Ed. 1998, B. Ed. 1992)
will receive the orders from this website—after all, she designed it and circulation is her specialty—renewals, new subscriptions and gifts, back issue orders, special requests! After nearly 10 years in the classroom, the former teacher has turned her extraordinary organizational skills to publishing.

People Directory

Milo Komenich

Milo Komenich (June 22, 1920—May 25, 1977) was an American collegiate and professional basketball player.

Komenich, a 6'7 center, played collegiately at the University of Wyoming after a standout high school career at Lew Wallace High School in Gary, Indiana. He played for the Cowboys from 1941–1943 and for the 1945-46 season. Alongside guard Ken Sailors, Komenich led the Cowboys to the 1943 National Championship.

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Publishing

Knowing the Purpose of Creation through the Resurrection

Proceedings of the Symposium on St. Maximus the Confessor

The present volume is a collection of presentations delivered at the St Maximus the Confessor International Symposium held in Belgrade at the University of Belgrade from 18 to 21 October 2012. The Belgrade Symposium brought together the following speakers: Demetrios Bathrellos, Grigory Benevitch, Calinic Berger, Paul Blowers, David Bradshaw, Adam Cooper, Brian Daley, Paul Gavrilyuk, Atanasije Jevtić, Joshua Lollar, Andrew Louth, John Panteleimon Manoussakis, Maximos of Simonopetra, Ignatije Midić, Pascal Mueller-Jourdan, Alexei Nesteruk, Aristotle Papanikolaou, George Parsenios, Philipp Gabriel Renczes, Nino Sakvarelidze, Torstein Tollefsen, George Varvatsoulias, Maxim Vasiljević, Christos Yannaras, and John Zizioulas. The papers and discussions in this volume of the proceedings of the Belgrade Symposium amply attest to the reputation of Saint Maximus the Confessor as the most universal spirit of the seventh century, and perhaps the greatest thinker of the Church. Twenty eight studies have been gathered in the present volume, which is organized into eight chapters, each of them corresponding to the proceedings of the Symposium, all of which are of intense interest and importance. Chapter One brings to light new evidence regarding the sources, influences, and appropriations of St Maximus’ teaching. His mediatorial role as one of the few genuinely ecumenical theologians of the patristic era is acknowledged and affirmed. Chapter Two offers some crucial clarifications on the relationship between person, nature, and freedom. In Chapter Three we find substantial discussion on body, pathos, love, eros, etc. New interpretive paradigms and insights are proposed in Chapter Four, while the next chapter presents the Confessor’s cosmological perspective in light of modern scientific discoveries. Some important ontological and ecclesiological issues are discussed in Chapter Six, while in Chapter Seven we are able to see what contemporary synthesis is possible through St Maximus’ thought. Chapter Eight offers further readings by engaging younger scholars who did not present their papers at the conference but whose studies were accepted by the organizers. In the final paper we find an important overview of the Symposium with a description of the conference’s flow. In an age of plurality and division, it is particularly important to know what our Tradition—shaped by the Fathers—can teach us. In any such endeavor, Saint Maximus the Confessor stands out as the most important theologian of the so-called Byzantine period. Yet his theology, assimilated and incorporated by Tradition, has relevance beyond any single historical period; in fact, the Confessor’s efforts to mediate between East and West distinguish his work as vital for contemporary theological discourse.

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