A great man is one who collects knowledge the way a bee collects honey and uses it to help people overcome the difficulties they endure - hunger, ignorance and disease!
- Nikola Tesla

Remember, remember always, that all of us, and you and I especially, are descended from immigrants and revolutionists.
- Franklin Roosevelt

While their territory has been devastated and their homes despoiled, the spirit of the Serbian people has not been broken.
- Woodrow Wilson

About the Staff

Everyone who works at Serb World U.S.A. loves a good story, especially one about Serbs in America, but they have come to the magazine from varied professions with unique perspectives. All share an enthusiasm not only for their own work but also for each other's. Together they explore the cultural world of Serbs and produce a magazine enjoyed by over 20,000 others.

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They can scan materials in seven languages — English, French, German, Russian, Serbo-Croatian, and Spanish. Most are American Serbs; some are not Serbs at all.

Bowker's Magazines for Libraries (1989) noted Serb World U.S.A.'squality, variety, and originality: 'It has maintained its editorial record as the best of its kind... the well-illustrated pages can feature a piece on making 'Serbian Spirits,' another way of talking about sljivovica. The dozen articles move from heroes of the O.S.S. to all-American Serb, Bronco Kosanovich."

Mary Nicklanovich Hart, Editor/Publisher (M.A. 1974, B.A. 1970, Phi Beta Kappa)
began editing and publishing Serb World U.S.A. in 1984. Prior to that, she had spent several years researching early South Slav immigration to the United States, published a few journal articles, and was several times a featured speaker on the subject. Her early works are based on primary documents and oral history, and much of that focused on Serbs in the American West—Bisbee and Globe in Arizona; Galveston, Texas; and White Pine County, Nevada.
In the magazine, she has turned to cultural topics which include an exploration of the Sokol movement, a description of The Slav Epic by Alphonse Mucha, and the development of "An Alphabet for the Slavs," the story of Cyrillic. In addition, she is the magazine's primary translator of works from Serbo-Croatian into English for the occasional bi-lingual format.
Among her major translations are the 1992, original English version of Dr. Stojan Lazarevic's History of the Belgrade Choral Society; numerous excerpts from Dr. Jovan Cvijic's (1865-1927) studies of the Balkan Peninsula; and English renderings of over 100 "Letters from Home" (1903-1945) contained in the rare Kosich "Srbin iz Like"Collection.

George Kosich, Chief Staff Writer
joined the magazine in 1984 just after he retired from a 30-year career as an executive in the brewing industry. He is a native of Wisconsin and long-time Milwaukee resident now living in Tucson.
His over 60 feature articles are proof of his wide interest in American Serbs, especially young professionals. He has interviewed artists, athletes, attorneys, judges, and scientists from coast to coast. He also took an in-depth look at Maximilian's Miramar and at cilim weaving in Old Serbia.
However, in the spring of 1985, he made history when he wrote "Mileva Marich of Novi Sad," one of the first accounts in English to conclude that Mileva Marich Einstein was a well-educated scientist in her own right. George Kosich is the master of the short article—focused, sharp, and witty.

Michael D. Nicklanovich, Feature Writer (M.S. 1966, B.S. 1964)
is an extraordinary writer at home with countless subjects. In addition to a book of poetry and two science textbooks, he began writing for the magazine while he was a professor of biology in Miami, Florida. He has since retired.
His over 100 feature articles extend from a 5-part series on Serbia in World War I to "Michael the Heavenly Warrior." Following the rivers and mountains, he has explored the Balkan peninsula. Tracing the origins of foods and herbs, he has discovered many secrets of the region.
In 1988, he brought the "Pirates of the Adriatic," the history of the Uskoks, and the "Serbs of No Man's Land," the history of the Military Frontier, to Serb World U.S.A.readers. In 1990 and in 1993, he spotlighted American Serbs who had won Pulitzers. The Montenegrin connections to the 'Merry Widow' and the Serbian route of the Orient Express were popular favorites as is his series on America's steel mill towns.

Philip D. Hart, Production Manager, Writer (M.A. 1975, B.A. 1970)
is one production manager who does everything from typesetting and design to writing feature stories. His original layouts are masterful, an expert selection of sharp images, the effective use of screens and color, and the drawing of original maps.
He is also a professional historian and former museum administrator, and several of his over 50 articles have found their way into bibliographies throughout the country. He began with a ground-breaking series on the American Serbs in the OSS. His article on Indiana Serb Matt Leach added an important chapter to the John Dillinger saga, and his series on the changing maps of the Balkans have included "Balkan Tightrope," "Flash Point," "Revolt in the Pashalik," and the "Treacherous Road to Autonomy."

Milan Opacich, Music Historian
is an all-around tamburitza master—a performer, an instrument builder, a teacher, a historian, and a writer—a man who makes both beautiful music and beautiful tamburitzas. Through his fifty years of experience, research, and writing, he has documented the contributions of countless musicians to the 100-year-old tamburitza tradition in the New World. Over 100 of his articles have appeared in his regular column, "Milan Opacich Presents," in Serb World U.S.A. and in his book Tamburitza America available through Black Mountain Publishers.

Mary Nicklanovich, Recipe Specialist
made her first cake when she was just 8 years old, and her mother, Marta, gave her free reign in the kitchen. That was over 70 years ago, and she has loved cooking ever since. In fact, she married a chef, Andrew M. Nicklanovich, and spent over forty years in the restaurant business. She knows Serbian food, of course, but is just as at home with chili or apple pie.
Over the past 22 years, she has done what few great cooks would ever do: revealed her favorite recipes and treasured secrets. Most of her Serbian dishes were unwritten, taught to her by her mother and close friends. The recipes she has published in Serb World U.S.A. are all authentic. Each was prepared according to exact measurements and then photographed. They are guaranteed, kitchen-tested, and comprise an extraordinary record of the finest Serb cooking.

Barbara Malczewski, Illustrator
was a scientific illustrator in her native Krakow, Poland. Since coming to America in the early 1980’s, she has branched out into original oils, exhibit design—and illustrating Serb World U.S.A.'s charming fairy tales. She draws on research and her own knowledge of Slavic folklore, plus a love of the fantastic, to bring the imaginary world of Serbian folk tales to life.

Holly Clark, Circulation Manager (M. Ed. 1998, B. Ed. 1992)
will receive the orders from this website—after all, she designed it and circulation is her specialty—renewals, new subscriptions and gifts, back issue orders, special requests! After nearly 10 years in the classroom, the former teacher has turned her extraordinary organizational skills to publishing.

People Directory

Branislav Bala

Branislav Bane Bala (writer/director/producer) is a Serbian filmmaker based in New York City. He holds an MFA in film directing from Columbia University.

His short films have played worldwide. His short film Shades of Gray was distributed by Doug Liman’s Hypnotic Releasing, and his commercial spot Magic was a Coca-Cola Refreshing Filmmaker’s Award selection. He co-produced two low-budget features: Across Dot Avenue and Romeo and Juliet in Yiddish. The latter was invited for a week-long run at New York’s famous Lincoln Center and opened to rave reviews. He has taught various film classes at the University of Hartford, The New School, Art Institute of Austin, Ramapo College and was the chair of the Film Department at Katharine Gibbs School. He often collaborates with his brother Nemanja. Their latest collaboration, a feature film “Love Hunter” premiered at the prestigious Warsaw Film Festival and was “among its highlights”, according to The Hollywood Reporter.

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Publishing

Jesus Christ Is The Same Yesterday Today And Unto the Ages

In this latest and, in every respect, meaningful study, Bishop Athanasius, in the manner of the Holy Fathers, and firmly relying upon the Apostles John and Paul, argues that the Old Testament name of God, “YHWH,” a revealed to Moses at Sinai, was translated by both Apostles (both being Hebrews) into the language of the New Testament in a completely original and articulate manner.  In this sense, they do not follow the Septuagint, in which the name, “YHWH,” appears together with the phrase “the one who is”, a word which is, in a certain sense, a philosophical-ontological translation (that term would undoubtedly become significant for the conversion of the Greeks in the Gospels).  The two Apostles, rather, translate this in a providential, historical-eschatological, i.e. in a specifically Christological sense.  Thus, John carries the word “YHWH” over with “the One Who Is, Who was and Who is to Come” (Rev. 1:8 & 22…), while for Paul “Jesus Christ is the Same Yesterday, Today and Unto the Ages” (Heb. 13:8).

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