A great man is one who collects knowledge the way a bee collects honey and uses it to help people overcome the difficulties they endure - hunger, ignorance and disease!
- Nikola Tesla

Remember, remember always, that all of us, and you and I especially, are descended from immigrants and revolutionists.
- Franklin Roosevelt

While their territory has been devastated and their homes despoiled, the spirit of the Serbian people has not been broken.
- Woodrow Wilson

How Serbian Immigrants Made an Ohio Town the ‘Fried Chicken Capital of the World’

From Vojvodina, with lard.
by Luke Fater, January 30, 2020

You can only try pahovana piletina in two places. One is Vojvodina, Serbia, where the unique style of fried chicken was born. The other is Ohio, where “Barberton-style fried chicken,” as it’s known there, became one small town’s claim to fame. What started as a comforting meal for an immigrant family came to define a community, turning a humble Ohio town into the “Fried Chicken Capital of the World.”

Smiljka and Manojlo Topalsky weren’t the only Eastern Europeans to leave home for a burgeoning Ohio farm-town called Barberton in the early 1900s. Their grandson, Milos Papich, points out that one of the oldest Serbian social clubs in the country is there, an hour south of Akron. The emigrated family owned a successful 300-acre dairy farm for decades.

During the Great Depression, though, the Topalskys lost everything but the farmhouse. Luckily, Smiljka could still cook.

On July 4th, 1933, the Topalskys opened an eatery out of that farmhouse. They called it Belgrade Gardens, and sold soups, chillis, and sandwiches to their struggling neighbors. “But it wasn’t enough to raise a family,” Papich says over the phone. One day, the story goes, Smiljka was in the back cooking a classic Serbian chicken dish for her family that she’d learned from her mother. After it caught the nose of one outspoken bank-teller, says Papich, he demanded they sell it to their regulars—a mishmash of recently immigrated Eastern Europeans who longed for a taste of home.

Once they had a taste, they couldn’t get enough. The chicken became an overnight hit among town denizens, and love of Smiljka’s fried chicken wove itself into the fabric of the community. “It kind of fell into their lap,” says Papich. “My grandparents never would have dreamed that the food they grew up with would be so well-received.”

Within seven years of putting Serbian fried chicken on their farmhouse menu, the Topalskys were able to buy back 65 acres of land from the bank, says Papich, current owner of 87-year-old Belgrade Gardens. The restaurant stayed with the family as much as pahovana piletina stays with Barberton. And to the purists in this still chicken-smitten town, Smiljka’s original dish is all but scripture.

SA

 

People Directory

Олга Иванова Лазовић

Олга Иванова Лазовић (1898—1988) била је америчка списатељица, плесачица, композитор, филозоф и учитељица црногорског порекла. Била је унука српског војводе, кучког јунака и писца Марка Миљанова и супруга америчког архитекте Френка Лојда Рајта.

Олга Иванова Лазовић рођена је 27. децембра 1898. године на Цетињу од оца Ивана Лазовића и мајке Милице. Олгина мајка Милица је била храбра ћерка војвода Марко Миљанов која је јула 1914. када је објављена општа мобилизација, као Милунка Савић, узела пушку и пријавила се као добровољац у Српску војску претварајући се да је мушкарац. Са српском војском је прошла све најважније битке и ратишта.

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Publishing

Residents of Heaven

An Exhibit of Byzantine and Modern Orthodox Icons

Residents of Heaven is a book of Icons by Father Stamatis Skliris which were prepared for "An Exhibit of Byzantine and Modern Orthodox Icons" held at the "David Allan Hubbard Library, Fuller Theological Seminary" in Pasadena, California, June 10 - July 5, 2010.

The iconographer, V. Rev. Stamatis Skliris, attended the opening of the exhibit with His Grace, Bishop Maxim who gave the Introduction. The mounting of the display was done by Jasminka Gabrie and the staff of the Fuller Library. The opening event was organized by Dr. William Dyrness, Director of the Visual Faith Institute, Brehm Center for Worship, Theology and the Arts, Fuller Seminary.