A great man is one who collects knowledge the way a bee collects honey and uses it to help people overcome the difficulties they endure - hunger, ignorance and disease!
- Nikola Tesla

Remember, remember always, that all of us, and you and I especially, are descended from immigrants and revolutionists.
- Franklin Roosevelt

While their territory has been devastated and their homes despoiled, the spirit of the Serbian people has not been broken.
- Woodrow Wilson

George Voinovich

United States Senator

George Victor Voinovich (born July 15, 1936) represents Ohio in the U.S. Senate, to which he was elected in 1998, and re-elected in 2004.

Born in Cleveland, Ohio, to a Serbian father and a Slovenian mother, Voinovich earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in government from Ohio University in 1958 and a law degree from the Ohio State University in 1961.

Voinovich began his political career in 1963 as an assistant attorney general of Ohio. He then served as a member of the Ohio House of Representatives from 1967 to 1971. From 1971 to 1976, he served as county auditor of Cuyahoga County, Ohio. In 1975, he made an unsuccessful run for the Republican nomination for mayor of Cleveland against incumbent Mayor Ralph J. Perk. . From 1977 to 1978, he served as a member of the Cuyahoga County Board of Commissioners. In 1978, Voinovich was elected lieutenant governor on the ticket with James A. Rhodes. After his victory in 1979, Voinovich won re-election in 1981 against Ohio state Rep. Patrick Sweeney and in 1985 against councilman Gary Kucinich.

In 1990, Voinovich was nominated by the Republicans to replace Gov. Richard F. Celeste, a Democrat who was barred from running for a third consecutive term. In that race, Voinovich defeated Anthony J. Celebrezze Jr., a victory that made Voinovich the first Serbian American ever to hold office as governor. In 1994, Voinovich was re-elected to the governorship, defeating Democrat Robert L. Burch Jr. with 72% of the vote.

Voinovich's tenure as governor saw Ohio's unemployment rate fall to a 25-year low, and the creation of more than 500,000 new jobs.

In 1998 Voinovich set his eyes on the U.S. Senate seat being vacated by long-time incumbent Democrat John Glenn. Voinovich won that race, defeating Democrat Mary O. Boyle. In November 2004, in his bid for re-election to the U.S. Senate, Voinovich easily defeated the Democratic nominee, Ohio state senator Eric Fingerhut.


People Directory

Desko Nikitovic

Desko Nikitovic, Executive Chairman of East Point Holdings, was born in Arilje, Serbia on November 11, 1960. He received his law degree from the University of Belgrade in 1989. From 1987 to 1990, Mr. Nikitovic was an active member of the “opposition movement” advocating democracy in Serbia. He immigrated to the United States in 1990 and has lived in Chicago for the past 26 years.

As a representative of Serbian diaspora in the United States, Mr. Nikitovic made numerous appearances on US national and local television and radio programs, promoting democratic changes in Yugoslavia. He served as President of the Serbian Unity Congress in Chicago, from 1998-2002.

In January of 2003, Nikitovic was appointed Consul General of Serbia in Chicago.

During his tenure as Consul General, Mr. Nikitovic pursued strong economic ties with the United States. He secured the prominent “Sister City” relationship between the Serbian Capitol Belgrade and the City of Chicago.

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Publishing

My Brother's Keeper

by Fr. Radovan Bigovic

Rare are the books of Orthodox Christian authors that deal with the subject of politics in a comprehensive way. It is taken for granted that politics has to do with the secularized (legal) protection of human rights (a reproduction of the philosophy of the Enlightenment), within the political system of so-called "representative democracy", which is limited mostly to social utility or to the conventional rules of human relations. Most Christians look at politics and democracy as unrelated with their experience of the Church herself, which abides both in history and in the Kingdom, the eschaton. Today, the commercialization of politics—its submission to the laws of publicity and the brainwashing of the masses—has literally abolished the "representative" parliamentary system. So, why bother with politics when every citizen of so-called developed societies has a direct everyday experience of the rapid decline and alienation of the fundamental aspects of modernity?

In the Orthodox milieu, Christos Yannaras has highlighted the conception of the social and political event that is borne by the Orthodox ecclesiastical tradition, which entails a personalistic (assumes an infinite value of the human person as opposed to Western utilitarian individualism) and relational approach. Fr Radovan Bigovic follows this approach. In this book, the reader will find a faithful engagement with the liturgical and patristic traditions, with contemporary thinkers, Orthodox and non-Orthodox, all in conversation with political science and philosophy. As an excellent Orthodox theologian and a proponent of dialogue, rooted in the catholic (holistic) being of the Orthodox Church and of his Serbian people, Fr Radovan offers a methodology that encompasses the above-mentioned concerns and quests.

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