A great man is one who collects knowledge the way a bee collects honey and uses it to help people overcome the difficulties they endure - hunger, ignorance and disease!
- Nikola Tesla

Remember, remember always, that all of us, and you and I especially, are descended from immigrants and revolutionists.
- Franklin Roosevelt

While their territory has been devastated and their homes despoiled, the spirit of the Serbian people has not been broken.
- Woodrow Wilson

Tatjana Aleksic

Tatjana Aleksic received her Ph.D. in Comparative Literature from Rutgers University in 2007 and has been teaching at the University of Michigan since 2007. She is the editor of Mythistory and Narratives of the Nation in the Balkans (2007). Additional publications include articles on nationalism, gender, language, and myth and translations into Serbian of short fiction, haiku, and medical textbooks.  She is the recipient of research awards from the University of Michigan (2008), Serbian Ministry for the Diaspora (2008), and a Rutgers University Dean’s fellowship (2002-2004).

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She is active in National Association for Slavic Studies, the American Comparative Literature Association, and the Association for Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies. Ongoing projects include a book manuscript on sacrifice, the body, and the nation.  Teaching interests in Comparative Literature include undergraduate courses on twentieth-century culture and history, women and myth, and graduate seminars on nationalism, and poststructuralist theory.

Languages:

  • Serbo-Croatian (Bosnian, Croatian, Serbian, native), working knowledge of French, Italian, Latin, Modern Greek.

Affiliation(s):

  • Comparative Literature, CREES, Slavic Languages & Literatures

Fields of Study:

  • Literary Theory
  • Postmodern Fiction
  • Contemporary Balkan literature, with an emphasis on Serbian and Modern Greek fiction
  • Balkan Film
  • Myth, History, and Memory
  • Nationalism
  • Postcolonialism
  • Exile
  • Issues of Identity
  • Gender Issues
  • Music

Select Publications:

  • Mythistory and Narratives of the Nation in the Balkans, ed. Tatjana Aleksic (Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2007)
  • “Making Patriarchal History Women’s Own: Eugenia Fakinou’s The Seventh Garment.” Forthcoming in Sanja Bahun-Radunovic and Julie Rajan, eds., Myth and Violence in Contemporary Female Text: New Cassandras, Surrey, UK: Ashgate, 2010.
  • “Southeast European Novel,” Blackwell Encyclopedia of the Novel,  ed. Peter Logan, 2010.
  • “National Definition through Postmodern Fragmentation: Milorad Pavic's Dictionary of the Khazars,” Slavic and East European Journal (SEEJ) 53:1 (Spring 2009): 86-104.
  • “The Emerging Subject of Rhea Galanaki’s Ismail Ferik Pasha,” Journal of Modern Greek Studies 27:1 (May 2009): 31-54.
  • “Grief Can only Be Written in One’s Mother Tongue.” Literature of Exile, ed. Agnieszka Gutty (New York, Berlin: Peter Lang Publishing, 2009) 155-175.
  • “Disintegrating Narratives and Nostalgia in Post-Yugoslav Postmodern Fiction.” Balkan Literatures in the Era of Nationalism, Murat Belge, Jale Parla, eds. Istanbul, Turkey: Bilgi University Press, 2009, 3-14.
  • “Extricating the Self from History: Bait by David Albahari.” MMLA Journal 39:2 (Fall 2006): 54-70.
  • Review of Lorraine Mortimer, Terror and Joy: The Films of Dušan Makavejev in The Slavic Review (Summer, 2010).
  • Review of Danilo Kiš, Mansarda, tr. John Cox in World Literature Today (March/April 2009): 68-9.
  • Review of Dubravka Ugrešic, Lend Me Your Character, tr. Celia Hawkesworth and Michael Henry Heim in Balkanistica 20, (Spring 2007): 185-187.

Education:

  • 2002 MA in English Literature and Theory, University Of Nis, Serbia
  • 2007 Ph.D. in Comparative Literature, Rutgers University

Book:

  • (2013) The Sacrificed Body

From: Slavic Languages & Literatures


People Directory

Oksana Germain

Oksana Germain, age 17, has been studying classical piano for 12 years. Her love of classical music was obvious from a very young age. Eagerly requesting piano lessons at age five, Oksana began learning locally with Mrs. Vera Rathje and Mrs. Yulia Atoyan. At age 13, Oksana was accepted as a student of world-renowned pedagogue and pianist, the late Dr. Vitaly Margulis, professor at UCLA. She continued her piano studies under Professor Margulis' tutelage until his passing in 2011. Since that time, Oksana has been studying with the dedicated and gifted, international pianist, Dr. Sarkis Baltaian of Los Angeles.

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Publishing

Knowing the Purpose of Creation through the Resurrection

Proceedings of the Symposium on St. Maximus the Confessor

The present volume is a collection of presentations delivered at the St Maximus the Confessor International Symposium held in Belgrade at the University of Belgrade from 18 to 21 October 2012. The Belgrade Symposium brought together the following speakers: Demetrios Bathrellos, Grigory Benevitch, Calinic Berger, Paul Blowers, David Bradshaw, Adam Cooper, Brian Daley, Paul Gavrilyuk, Atanasije Jevtić, Joshua Lollar, Andrew Louth, John Panteleimon Manoussakis, Maximos of Simonopetra, Ignatije Midić, Pascal Mueller-Jourdan, Alexei Nesteruk, Aristotle Papanikolaou, George Parsenios, Philipp Gabriel Renczes, Nino Sakvarelidze, Torstein Tollefsen, George Varvatsoulias, Maxim Vasiljević, Christos Yannaras, and John Zizioulas. The papers and discussions in this volume of the proceedings of the Belgrade Symposium amply attest to the reputation of Saint Maximus the Confessor as the most universal spirit of the seventh century, and perhaps the greatest thinker of the Church. Twenty eight studies have been gathered in the present volume, which is organized into eight chapters, each of them corresponding to the proceedings of the Symposium, all of which are of intense interest and importance. Chapter One brings to light new evidence regarding the sources, influences, and appropriations of St Maximus’ teaching. His mediatorial role as one of the few genuinely ecumenical theologians of the patristic era is acknowledged and affirmed. Chapter Two offers some crucial clarifications on the relationship between person, nature, and freedom. In Chapter Three we find substantial discussion on body, pathos, love, eros, etc. New interpretive paradigms and insights are proposed in Chapter Four, while the next chapter presents the Confessor’s cosmological perspective in light of modern scientific discoveries. Some important ontological and ecclesiological issues are discussed in Chapter Six, while in Chapter Seven we are able to see what contemporary synthesis is possible through St Maximus’ thought. Chapter Eight offers further readings by engaging younger scholars who did not present their papers at the conference but whose studies were accepted by the organizers. In the final paper we find an important overview of the Symposium with a description of the conference’s flow. In an age of plurality and division, it is particularly important to know what our Tradition—shaped by the Fathers—can teach us. In any such endeavor, Saint Maximus the Confessor stands out as the most important theologian of the so-called Byzantine period. Yet his theology, assimilated and incorporated by Tradition, has relevance beyond any single historical period; in fact, the Confessor’s efforts to mediate between East and West distinguish his work as vital for contemporary theological discourse.