A great man is one who collects knowledge the way a bee collects honey and uses it to help people overcome the difficulties they endure - hunger, ignorance and disease!
- Nikola Tesla

Remember, remember always, that all of us, and you and I especially, are descended from immigrants and revolutionists.
- Franklin Roosevelt

While their territory has been devastated and their homes despoiled, the spirit of the Serbian people has not been broken.
- Woodrow Wilson

Metropolitan Irinej (Kovačević)

(1963–1998)

Milan Kovačević was born to Sreten and Kristine Kovačević on 6 September, 1914, in the village Vrnčani near Gornji Milanovac in the Kingdom of Serbia. Milan completed primary school in his village, and high school in Gornji Milanovac. After completing the course at the Teachers High School, he served as a teacher in the village Ljutovnica near Gornji Milanovac.

In 1941, during World War II, because he was at that time an army reserve officer, he was taken by the Nazis to a camp in Germany, where he remained until 1945. After the liberation, Milan went to England, where he temporarily attended a seminary in Dorchester.

In 1950, he emigrated to the USA, and he enrolled in the Saint Vladimir’s Orthodox Theological Seminary in New York, and also in Columbia University.

In October, 1953, Milan entered the Serbian Orthodox Monastery of Saint Sava in Libertyville, Illinois. On 30 December, 1953, he was tonsured to be a monk by Archimandrite Firmilian (Ocokoljić), and he was given the name Irinej. On 31 December, 1953, the Monk Irinej was ordained to the Holy Diaconate in the monastery by Bishop Dionisije, while on April, 1954, the Hierodeacon Irinej was ordained to the priesthood in the monastery by Bishop Dionisije. On 31 August, 1956, the Hieromonk Irinej was elevated to the dignity of igumen (abbot).

In 1961, upon the recommendation of Bishop Dionisije, the Holy Synod of the Serbian Orthodox Church elevated Igumen Irinej to the dignity of archimandrite.

In 1963, the schism of Bishop Dionisije began. Bishop Dionisije did not accept the decision of the Holy Synod about the creation of 3 new dioceses, namely, “Midwestern America”, “Eastern America” and “Canada and Western America”. This matter also involved political concerns. In that year, Bishop Dionisije summoned the 10th National-Church assembly, which met in Libertyville from November 10-14, 1963. It was decided not to receive any decisions, orders, and instructions of the Holy Assembly of Bishops (“Sabor”) and of the Holy Synod in Belgrade in Yugoslavia, as long as the Serbian government remained a communist regime. The assembly rejected all decisions about the suspension of Bishop Dionisije, and about the division of the US-Canadian eparchy into 3 new ones. It was also decided to declare that the American-Canadian Diocese was now free and independent.

At the same Tenth National-Church Assembly, Archimandrite Irinej was elected to become a bishop. On 7 December, 1963, archimandrite Irinej was ordained to the episcopate by Bishop Dionisije along with two Ukrainian Orthodox bishops, Bishop Genadije and Bishop Gregory. On the Feast of the Dormition on 28 August, 1983, the Free Serbian American-Canadian Bishop Irinej (Kovačević), the Bishop of Australia and New Zealand Petar (Bankerović) and the Western European Bishop Vasilije (Veinović) proclaimed at the New Gračanica Monastery near Chicago, the establishment of the Synod of Bishops. The New Gračanica Monastery served as the new headquarters of the American-Canadian Diocese. The monastery was consecrated on 12 August, 1984. At that time, Bishop Irinej, the Free Serbian Bishop for the United States and Canada, was declared to be a metropolitan.

In 1992, at the invitation of Pavle the Patriarch of Serbia, Metropolitan Irinej led a delegation of priests and other persons from the whole of the Free Serbian Orthodox Church to Serbia. A reconciliation proposal was made, in which the Free Serbian Orthodox Church would be accepted within the patriarchate as the “New Gračanica Metropolitanate” (amongst other constitutional edits). The reconciliation was achieved. The mutual eucharistic unity was confirmed with a joint Divine Liturgy in Belgrade in February, 1992.

The validity of the hierarchal ordinations was recognised about the Bishop of the Diocese of America and Canada and the Metropolitan of the Free Serbian Orthodox Church, Irenej (Kovačević), as well as the hierarchs : Bishop Dimitrije (Balać), Bishop Petar (Bankerović), Bishop Vasilije (Veinović) and Bishop Damaskin (Davidović).

The Holy Synod of the Serbian Orthodox Church replaced the Episcopal Council of the New Gračanica Metropolitanate. Every new diocesan hierarch of the New Gračanica Metropolitanate is chosen by the Holy Assembly of Bishops of the Serbian Orthodox Church from amongst the candidates entered in the list of candidates on the proposal of the Episcopal Council of the New Gračanica Metropolitanate. The elected candidate is ordained by the Patriarch of Serbia.

After a long and serious illness, Metropolitan Irinej (Kovačević) fell asleep in the Lord on 2 February, 1998, in the New Gračanica Monastery, near Chicago. After the funeral services on 8 February, 1998, he was entombed in the monastery, on the right side.


SA

 

People Directory

Vladimir Dedijer

Vladimir-Vlado Dedijer (Beograd, 4. februar 1914 — Boston, 30. novembar 1990) je bio akademik, istoričar, publicista novinar i učesnik Narodnooslobodilačke borbe.

Biografija

Vlado je rođen 4. februara 1914. godine u Beogradu, gde je proveo detinjstvo i mladost. Tu je završio osnovnu školu i gimnaziju. Upisuje Pravni fakultet u Beogradu, kada zbog nemaštine i nemogućnosti da plaća studije počinje da radi kao dopisnik iz zemlje, a kasnije i sveta za „Politiku“.

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Publishing

On Divine Philanthropy

From Plato to John Chrysostom

by Bishop Danilo Krstic

This book describes the use of the notion of divine philanthropy from its first appearance in Aeschylos and Plato to the highly polyvalent use of it by John Chrysostom. Each page is marked by meticulous scholarship and great insight, lucidity of thought and expression. Bishop Danilo’s principal methodology in examining Chrysostom is a philological analysis of his works in order to grasp all the semantic shades of the concept of philanthropia throughout his vast literary output. The author overviews the observable development of the concept of philanthropia in a research that encompasses nearly seven centuries of literary sources. Peculiar theological connotations are studied in the uses of divine philanthropia both in the classical development from Aeschylos via Plutarch down to Libanius, Themistius of Byzantium and the Emperor Julian, as well as in the biblical development, especially from Philo and the New Testament through Origen and the Cappadocians to Chrysostom.

With this book, the author invites us to re-read Chrysostom’s golden pages on the ineffable philanthropy of God. "There is a modern ring in Chrysostom’s attempt to prove that we are loved—no matter who and where we are—and even infinitely loved, since our Friend and Lover is the infinite Triune God."

The victory of Chrysostom’s use of philanthropia meant the affirmation of ecclesial culture even at the level of Graeco-Roman culture. May we witness the same reality today in the modern techno-scientific world in which we live.