A great man is one who collects knowledge the way a bee collects honey and uses it to help people overcome the difficulties they endure - hunger, ignorance and disease!
- Nikola Tesla

Remember, remember always, that all of us, and you and I especially, are descended from immigrants and revolutionists.
- Franklin Roosevelt

While their territory has been devastated and their homes despoiled, the spirit of the Serbian people has not been broken.
- Woodrow Wilson

Željka Cvjetan Gortinski

Željka Cvjetan Gortinski, an actress, is a member of the Society of Dramatic Artists of Serbia and the Afta - SAG Union. 

She earned a Bachelor of Arts in acting, in 1984, at the University of Arts, Belgrade.

During her second year at the University, she started her professional career as an actress in many stage, film, radio and TV productions and became a permanent member of a repertory theater company, “Belgrade Drama Theater.”. Zeljka was fortunate to work with some of the greatest directors in the former Yugoslavia: Dusan Jovanovic, Slobodan Unkovski, Dejan Mijac, and Egon Savin. She starred in successful TV mini series: “The Forgotten Ones”, “House of Gloom” and “The Portrait of Ilija Pevac” as well as in feature films, “Oktoberfest”, “Odyssey Over Igman” and “The Little Carrot You Do Not Grow Nicely.” In 1991, Ms Gortinski and her family moved to California where she has continued her acting career and education, having earned a Master’s Degree in Theater from the California State University, Los Angeles in 1997.

Official web-site


SA

 

People Directory

Nikola Resanovic

Nikola Resanovic (born 1955) is an American composer and professor of music. He is the winner of the 2003 Cleveland Arts Prize in Music and is one of Ohio's best known living composers.

In 1955, he was born in Derby, England. Resanovic moved to the United States where he has been a naturalized citizen since 1976. He holds degrees from the University of Akron and the Cleveland Institute of Music. He is currently a Professor of Music and the University of Akron.

. Read more ...

Publishing

Holy Emperor Constantine and the Edict of Milan

by Bishop Athanasius (Yevtich)

In 2013 Christian world celebrates 1700 years since the day when the Providence of God spoke through the holy Emperor Constantine and freedom was given to the Christian faith. Commemorating the 1700 years since the Edict of Milan of 313, Sebastian Press of the Western American Diocese of the Serbian Orthodox Church published a book by Bishop Athanasius Yevtich, Holy Emperor Constantine and the Edict of Milan. The book has 72 pages and was translated by Popadija Aleksandra Petrovich. This excellent overview of the historical circumstances that lead to the conversion of the first Christian emperor and to the publication of a document that was called "Edict of Milan", was originally published in Serbian by the Brotherhood of St. Simeon the Myrrh-gusher, Vrnjci 2013. “The Edict of Milan” is calling on civil authorities everywhere to respect the right of believers to worship freely and to express their faith publicly.

The publication of this beautiful pocket-size, full-color, English-language book, has been compiled and designed by Bishop Athanasius Yevtich, a disciple of the great twentieth-century theologian Archimandrite Justin Popovich. Bishop Athanasius' thought combines adherence to the teachings of the Church Fathers with a vibrant faith, knowledge of history, and a profound experience of Christ in the Church.

In the conclusion of the book, the author states:"The era of St. Constantine and his mother St. Helena, marks the beginning of what history refers to as Roman, Christian Empire, which was named Byzantium only in recent times in the West. In fact, this was the conception of a Christian Europe. Christian Byzantine culture had a critical effect on Europe; Europe was its heir, and then consciously forgot it. Europe inherited many Byzantine treasures, but unfortunately, also robbed and plundered many others for its own treasuries and museums – not only during the Crusades, but during colonial rule in the Byzantine lands as well. We, the Orthodox Slavs, received a great heritage of the Orthodox Christian East from Byzantium. Primarily, Christ’s Gospel, His faith and His Church, and then, among other things, the Cyrillic alphabet, too."