A great man is one who collects knowledge the way a bee collects honey and uses it to help people overcome the difficulties they endure - hunger, ignorance and disease!
- Nikola Tesla

Remember, remember always, that all of us, and you and I especially, are descended from immigrants and revolutionists.
- Franklin Roosevelt

While their territory has been devastated and their homes despoiled, the spirit of the Serbian people has not been broken.
- Woodrow Wilson

Olga Gradojevich

December 19, 1937 - August 30, 2022
Olga Radosavljevich-Gradojevich, 84 of Bratenahl/Seven Hills passed away in Seven Hills, Ohio on August 30, 2022. Olga (affectionately known as Miss Olga) was born in Belgrade, Serbia on December 19, 1937, to Nadezda and Vojislav Radosavljevich (Both Deceased) She immigrated to the United States of America at age 18 and enrolled at The Cleveland Institute of Music where she completed her Bachelor of Music, Master of Music and an Artist Diploma in piano performance with renowned teachers Arthur Loesser, Victor Babin and Vitya Vronsky Babin.

Olga married Vojin Gradojevich and together they had two children, Mihailo (Mickey) and Katarina (Katherine ). She was a dedicated and loved teacher and performer at The Cleveland Institute of Music for 63 years. Olga was proud of her Serbian heritage and her Orthodox faith. She is survived by her son Mihailo Gradojevich, daughter Katherine Gradojevich Manker, son-in-law Brian Manker, grandchildren Richard and Sophie Manker. Olga was predeceased by her husband Vojin Gradojevich (1926-2013).


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People Directory

Stana Katic

Stana Katic (born April 26, 1978) is a Canadian film and television actress. She is best known for her portrayal of Detective Kate Beckett on the popular ABC series Castle.

Katic was born in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, to Serbian parents named Peter and Rada Katić. In describing her ethnicity, she has stated her parents are Serbs. They emigrated from Yugoslavia. Her father is from Vrlika, and her mother is from the surrounding area of Sinj. Katic later moved with her family to Aurora, Illinois. She spent the following years moving back and forth between Canada and the United States.

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Publishing

Holy Emperor Constantine and the Edict of Milan

by Bishop Athanasius (Yevtich)

In 2013 Christian world celebrates 1700 years since the day when the Providence of God spoke through the holy Emperor Constantine and freedom was given to the Christian faith. Commemorating the 1700 years since the Edict of Milan of 313, Sebastian Press of the Western American Diocese of the Serbian Orthodox Church published a book by Bishop Athanasius Yevtich, Holy Emperor Constantine and the Edict of Milan. The book has 72 pages and was translated by Popadija Aleksandra Petrovich. This excellent overview of the historical circumstances that lead to the conversion of the first Christian emperor and to the publication of a document that was called "Edict of Milan", was originally published in Serbian by the Brotherhood of St. Simeon the Myrrh-gusher, Vrnjci 2013. “The Edict of Milan” is calling on civil authorities everywhere to respect the right of believers to worship freely and to express their faith publicly.

The publication of this beautiful pocket-size, full-color, English-language book, has been compiled and designed by Bishop Athanasius Yevtich, a disciple of the great twentieth-century theologian Archimandrite Justin Popovich. Bishop Athanasius' thought combines adherence to the teachings of the Church Fathers with a vibrant faith, knowledge of history, and a profound experience of Christ in the Church.

In the conclusion of the book, the author states:"The era of St. Constantine and his mother St. Helena, marks the beginning of what history refers to as Roman, Christian Empire, which was named Byzantium only in recent times in the West. In fact, this was the conception of a Christian Europe. Christian Byzantine culture had a critical effect on Europe; Europe was its heir, and then consciously forgot it. Europe inherited many Byzantine treasures, but unfortunately, also robbed and plundered many others for its own treasuries and museums – not only during the Crusades, but during colonial rule in the Byzantine lands as well. We, the Orthodox Slavs, received a great heritage of the Orthodox Christian East from Byzantium. Primarily, Christ’s Gospel, His faith and His Church, and then, among other things, the Cyrillic alphabet, too."