A great man is one who collects knowledge the way a bee collects honey and uses it to help people overcome the difficulties they endure - hunger, ignorance and disease!
- Nikola Tesla

Remember, remember always, that all of us, and you and I especially, are descended from immigrants and revolutionists.
- Franklin Roosevelt

While their territory has been devastated and their homes despoiled, the spirit of the Serbian people has not been broken.
- Woodrow Wilson

Tesla: The Musical is a full-length, all-original rock opera about the life, mind, and legacy of turn-of-the-century inventor Nikola Tesla.

On July 10th, 1856, a boy was born at midnight during a lightning storm in present-day Croatia. Twenty-eight years later, he would come to America with virtually nothing but his education and a mind unlike any other. He would change the world forever with alternating current – the form of electricity we use to this day. He would go toe-to-toe with Thomas Edison, one of the most powerful men on the planet, who did everything he could to get in his way. He would suffer from mental illness in a time before proper diagnosis and treatment were available. He would be admired by scores of women but would never marry or have children, as he feared they would distract him from his work. He would fail at just as many endeavors as he succeeded at. Because he took no royalties for his AC patents, ensuring that safe, cheap electricity would reach every corner of the globe, he would die broke, alone, and insane. After his death he would be largely forgotten as he left behind no companies or children.

His name was Nikola Tesla. This is his story – the man, the myth, the musical.

Breze is the female ethno choir of St. Sava Serbian Orthodox Church in Phoenix, AZ. Breze is composed completely of Stevan Hristich church choir members who have chosen to expand their singing talents outside of the liturgical environment.

This group was formed in early January of 2013 by Gordana Stojanovic Mihajlovich and its members all posses a deep passion for singing. They hope to grow and make this group a success not only in Phoenix, but also through Serbian communities across the world.

Breze hopes to further educate young people of the Serbian Diaspora about Serbian culture and traditions as well as present the heritage of Serbian ethnic music. Breze aspires to encourage younger generations to be get involved in their Serbian heritage and traditions. They also hope to encourage the continuation of traditional songs in the Serbian Orthodox culture and faith as an important part of the participants' lives.

Breze has been extremely active since their start. Their performances include: the St Sava Day celebration in Phoenix, the Global Village festival in Gilbert, the Stevan Hristich Liturgical Concert in Phoenix, and SSF Festival in Lansing, IL. They are looking forward to performing at Diocesan Days in Los Angeles in September, and at the annual Stevan Hristich choir concert in October 2013. They are also looking to traveling to Chicago with the choir in November.

The members of Breze are: Alexis Baich, Marina Lazarevic, Vesna Lazarevic, Natasha Novakovic, Nina Novakovic, Sasha Pasic, Stefany Pasic, Mihaila Tuba and Marija Knezevic. They are directed by Gordana Stojanovic-Mihajlovich, with a help of assistant director, Ivana Njegovan.

Breze also has a group of great people behind the scenes supporting the team of singers: Mila Baich, choir president, as well as other members of the supporting staff, Slavica Ristic, protinica Kristina Tuba and Kristi Lazarevic. The group is also greatly accepted and supported by many members of the St Sava parish in Phoenix, Arizona, led by very reverent father Dragomir Tuba. Breze are looking forward to the future projects and songs! Stay tuned…

BREZE ETHNO CHOIR YOUTUBE CHANNEL

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Djordje Nesic

Djordje Stevan Nesic’s pianism has been described as ‘artful‘, ‘assertive‘, ‘sensitive‘ and ‘quietly virtuosic‘, and his career has been highlighted by recital, concerto, chamber, and collaborative performances. During the current season, Mr. Nesic performed live on A Prairie Home Companion with Garrison Keillor, recorded seven newly commissioned American art songs for the Opera America Songbook project, performed in both concert and recital at Greenwich Music Festival’s All Things Stravinsky season; Carnegie Hall in New York City, the Ohana Arts Festival in Honolulu, Cincinnati’s Taft Museum and the Underground Railroad Museum Freedom Center, as well as at the University of Wisconsin and the Next Act Theater in Milwaukee. He was also featured in the PBS broadcast of “This Little Light of Mine” with soprano Adrienne Danrich, which was awarded a midwest Emmy Award in 2011. Among the pianist’s recent Manhattan performances are those at Lincoln Center in its “Meet the Artist” series; Carnegie’s Weill and Zankel halls; the United Nations General Assembly Hall; the River to River Festival; Tribeca’s Ico Gallery; the Trinity Church Wall Street.

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Jesus Christ Is The Same Yesterday Today And Unto the Ages

In this latest and, in every respect, meaningful study, Bishop Athanasius, in the manner of the Holy Fathers, and firmly relying upon the Apostles John and Paul, argues that the Old Testament name of God, “YHWH,” a revealed to Moses at Sinai, was translated by both Apostles (both being Hebrews) into the language of the New Testament in a completely original and articulate manner.  In this sense, they do not follow the Septuagint, in which the name, “YHWH,” appears together with the phrase “the one who is”, a word which is, in a certain sense, a philosophical-ontological translation (that term would undoubtedly become significant for the conversion of the Greeks in the Gospels).  The two Apostles, rather, translate this in a providential, historical-eschatological, i.e. in a specifically Christological sense.  Thus, John carries the word “YHWH” over with “the One Who Is, Who was and Who is to Come” (Rev. 1:8 & 22…), while for Paul “Jesus Christ is the Same Yesterday, Today and Unto the Ages” (Heb. 13:8).