A great man is one who collects knowledge the way a bee collects honey and uses it to help people overcome the difficulties they endure - hunger, ignorance and disease!
- Nikola Tesla

Remember, remember always, that all of us, and you and I especially, are descended from immigrants and revolutionists.
- Franklin Roosevelt

While their territory has been devastated and their homes despoiled, the spirit of the Serbian people has not been broken.
- Woodrow Wilson

Tatjana Aleksic

Tatjana Aleksic received her Ph.D. in Comparative Literature from Rutgers University in 2007 and has been teaching at the University of Michigan since 2007. She is the editor of Mythistory and Narratives of the Nation in the Balkans (2007). Additional publications include articles on nationalism, gender, language, and myth and translations into Serbian of short fiction, haiku, and medical textbooks.  She is the recipient of research awards from the University of Michigan (2008), Serbian Ministry for the Diaspora (2008), and a Rutgers University Dean’s fellowship (2002-2004).

.

She is active in National Association for Slavic Studies, the American Comparative Literature Association, and the Association for Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies. Ongoing projects include a book manuscript on sacrifice, the body, and the nation.  Teaching interests in Comparative Literature include undergraduate courses on twentieth-century culture and history, women and myth, and graduate seminars on nationalism, and poststructuralist theory.

Languages:

  • Serbo-Croatian (Bosnian, Croatian, Serbian, native), working knowledge of French, Italian, Latin, Modern Greek.

Affiliation(s):

  • Comparative Literature, CREES, Slavic Languages & Literatures

Fields of Study:

  • Literary Theory
  • Postmodern Fiction
  • Contemporary Balkan literature, with an emphasis on Serbian and Modern Greek fiction
  • Balkan Film
  • Myth, History, and Memory
  • Nationalism
  • Postcolonialism
  • Exile
  • Issues of Identity
  • Gender Issues
  • Music

Select Publications:

  • Mythistory and Narratives of the Nation in the Balkans, ed. Tatjana Aleksic (Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2007)
  • “Making Patriarchal History Women’s Own: Eugenia Fakinou’s The Seventh Garment.” Forthcoming in Sanja Bahun-Radunovic and Julie Rajan, eds., Myth and Violence in Contemporary Female Text: New Cassandras, Surrey, UK: Ashgate, 2010.
  • “Southeast European Novel,” Blackwell Encyclopedia of the Novel,  ed. Peter Logan, 2010.
  • “National Definition through Postmodern Fragmentation: Milorad Pavic's Dictionary of the Khazars,” Slavic and East European Journal (SEEJ) 53:1 (Spring 2009): 86-104.
  • “The Emerging Subject of Rhea Galanaki’s Ismail Ferik Pasha,” Journal of Modern Greek Studies 27:1 (May 2009): 31-54.
  • “Grief Can only Be Written in One’s Mother Tongue.” Literature of Exile, ed. Agnieszka Gutty (New York, Berlin: Peter Lang Publishing, 2009) 155-175.
  • “Disintegrating Narratives and Nostalgia in Post-Yugoslav Postmodern Fiction.” Balkan Literatures in the Era of Nationalism, Murat Belge, Jale Parla, eds. Istanbul, Turkey: Bilgi University Press, 2009, 3-14.
  • “Extricating the Self from History: Bait by David Albahari.” MMLA Journal 39:2 (Fall 2006): 54-70.
  • Review of Lorraine Mortimer, Terror and Joy: The Films of Dušan Makavejev in The Slavic Review (Summer, 2010).
  • Review of Danilo Kiš, Mansarda, tr. John Cox in World Literature Today (March/April 2009): 68-9.
  • Review of Dubravka Ugrešic, Lend Me Your Character, tr. Celia Hawkesworth and Michael Henry Heim in Balkanistica 20, (Spring 2007): 185-187.

Education:

  • 2002 MA in English Literature and Theory, University Of Nis, Serbia
  • 2007 Ph.D. in Comparative Literature, Rutgers University

Book:

  • (2013) The Sacrificed Body

From: Slavic Languages & Literatures


SA

 

People Directory

John Alexander Vidović

John Vidovic is a young musician and composer whose talents, work with students, and presence in various musical circles have already created a significant community impact. Mr. Vidovic specializes in classical guitar, music theory and composition. He has been playing guitar for 13 years and has accumulated 11 years of experience as a self-taught pianist.

John studied guitar with Michael McChesney and Barrios scholar Richard Stover, as well as voice with Christopher Bengochea. He graduated from UCLA with a BA in music composition. As a composer, he has 9 years of experience in composition ranging from solo works to large ensembles, including chorus, wind ensemble and orchestra. He has also conducted original choral composition under the direction of Maestro Donald Neuen with the UCLA Chamber Singers in Royce Hall in June 2011. Mr. Vidovic composed choral works for the West Valley College Chamber singers performed at the Finale concerts in May 2009 and December 2011. His main influences include music from Latin America, Romantic era music, and folk music from Eastern Europe.

.
Read more ...

Publishing

Sailors of the Sky

A conversation with Fr. Stamatis Skliris and Fr. Marko Rupnik on contemporary Christian art

In these timely conversations led by Fr. Radovan Bigovic, many issues are introduced that enable the contemporary reader to deepen and expand his or her understanding of the role of art in the life of the Church. Here we find answers to questions on the crisis of contemporary ecclesiastical art in West and East; the impact of Impressionism, Expressionism, Cubism, Surrealism and Abstract painting on contemporary ecclesiastical painting; and a consideration of the main distrinction between iconography and secular painting. The dialogue, while resolving some doubts about the difference between iconography, religious painting, and painting in general, reconciles the requirement to obey inconographic canons with the freedom essential to artistic creativity, demonstrating that obedience to the canons is not a threat to the vitatlity of iconography. Both artists illumine the role of prayer and ascetisicm in the art of iconography. They also mention curcial differences between iconography in the Orthodox Church and in Roman Catholicism. How important thse distinctions are when exploring the relationship between contemporary theology and art! In a time when postmodern "metaphysics' revitalizes every concept, these masters still believe that, to some extent, Post-Modernism adds to the revitatiztion of Christian art, stimulating questions about "artistic inspiration" and the essential asethetic categories of Christian painting. Their exceptionally wide, yet nonetheless deep, expertise assists their not-so-everday connections between theology, ar, and modern issues concerning society: "society" taken in its broader meaning as "civilization." Finally, the entire artistic project of Stamatis and Rupnik has important ecumenical implications that aswer a genuine longing for unity in the Christian word.

The text of this 94-page soft-bound book has been translated from the Serbian by Ivana Jakovljevic, Fr. Gregory Edwards, and Andrijana Krstic. Published by Sebastian Press, Western American Diocese of the Serbian Orthodox Church, Contemporary Christian Thought Series, number 7, First Edition, ISBN: 978-0-9719505-8-0